Mozambique since independence

Started by <k>, June 13, 2017, 01:02:46 PM

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<k>



The reverse design of the 1000 meticais coin featured the Ministry of Finance and Planning in Maputo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The Ministry of Finance and Planning in Maputo, Mozambique.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The obverse of the 5000 meticais coin  of 1998.

Inflation was rising, and in 1998 a 5000 meticais coin was issued.

This was a one-year coin only.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse design of the 5000 meticais coin.

The unusual design of electric pylons was the work of Royal Mint artist Robert Elderton.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




A 10,000 meticais coin was issued in 2003. 


The bimetallic coin had a stainless steel centre within a brass ring.

It had a diameter of 26.6 mm and weighed 8 grams.


This was a one-year coin only.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse design of the 10,000 meticais coin.

The rhinoceros design was the work of Welsh artist Michael Guilfoyle.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

New Design Series of 2006.



From Wikipedia:

On July 1 2006, Mozambique redenominated the metical at a rate of 1000:1.

New coins and banknotes were introduced on July 1 2006.

The transitional period during which both old and new meticais could be used lasted until December 31, 2006.



The new coinage was designed and produced by the Royal Mint, UK.

The reverse designs were the work of Welsh artist Michael Guilfoyle.

He had created the rhino design for the 10,000 meticais coin of 2003.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The common obverse design of the new coinage, seen on the 1 centavo coin.

The design featured the logo of the Central Bank of Mozambique.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#53
Mozambique 1 centavo 2006.jpg

Here Michael Guilfoyle has reprised the rhino design for the reverse of the 1 centavo coin.

Since it is a very small coin, he has removed the background that appeared on the original coin.

The copper-plated steel coin has a diameter of 15 mm.



The rhino joins the small club of designs that have moved from the highest denomination to the smallest.

Sometimes this has occurred in the opposite direction.

For instance, the woodcock design on the Irish farthing moved onto the 50 pence coin after decimalisation.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse of the 5 centavos coin features a cheetah.

A cheetah's head had previously been depicted on the 50 meticais in the 1990s.

Mozambique is still the only country to have depicted a cheetah on its circulation coinage.

See also: Cheetahs on coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Here you see common obverse design on the higher denomination brass-clad steel coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse of the 10 centavos coin features a man driving a tractor.

The same theme, but with a different design, appeared on the 5 meticais coin of the 1980s.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse of the 20 centavos coin features a cotton plant.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse of the 50 centavos coin features a brown-headed kingfisher (Halcyon albiventris).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The obverse of the nickel-plated steel 1 metical coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.