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Mozambique since independence

Started by <k>, June 13, 2017, 01:02:46 PM

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<k>

#30
Mozambique flag.jpg

Shortly afterwards an amended flag was introduced, which is still used today.

Some Mozambicans would nowadays like to see the Kalashnikov rifle removed from the flag.

So far there are no plans to change the flag.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

New Design Series of 1994.

Mozambique released a new design series in 1994. The country's first democratic elections were also held that year.

The new constitution enacted in 1990 had provided for a multi-party political system, market-based economy, and free elections.

The civil war ended in October 1992, and in 1995 Mozambique joined the Commonwealth of Nations, despite never having been a British colony.

The mood of the country was changing, and the military and socialist theme of the last set was removed. Still, however, the student woman featured on the 1 metical coin.

This time the coins were produced by the Royal Mint. The reverse designs were the work of Geoffrey Colley.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The common obverse of the coins featured the national emblem.

Here you see how it looked on the lower denominations: the brass-clad steel coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The 1 metical coin was made of brass-clad steel.

The reverse design featured the familiar female student.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The 5 meticais coin was made of brass-clad steel.

The reverse design featured a brown-headed kingfisher (Halcyon albiventris).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



A brown-headed kingfisher (Halcyon albiventris).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The 10 meticais coin was made of brass-clad steel.

The reverse design featured a cotton plant.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The 20 meticais coin was made of brass-clad steel.

The reverse design featured cashew apples.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Cashew apples.

From Wikipedia:

The cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale) is a tropical evergreen tree that produces the cashew seed and the cashew apple accessory fruit. The cashew seed is commonly considered a snack nut (cashew nut) eaten on its own, used in recipes, or processed into cashew cheese or cashew butter. Like the tree, the nut is often simply called a cashew.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The higher denomination coins were made of nickel-clad steel.

Here you see how the common obverse design looked on those coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse design of the 50 meticais coin featured a cheetah.

This was the first time that the species had been depicted on any circulation coin.


Mozambique is still the only country that has depicted a cheetah on its circulation coins.

See: Analysis of animal species featured on African circulation coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



A cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

The cheetah is a large cat, which is native to Africa and central Iran.

It is the world's fastest land animal, estimated to be capable of running at 80 to 128 km/h (50 to 80 mph).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse design of the 100 meticais coin featured a lobster.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse design of the 500 meticais coin featured Beira Railway Station.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#44
Beira rail station.jpg

Beira railway station, Mozambique.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.