Author Topic: Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue  (Read 625 times)

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Offline jsalgado

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Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue
« on: May 16, 2017, 05:01:07 PM »

Copper  15,97 g   32 mm  Many thanks for your help.






Offline Manzikert

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Re: Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2017, 05:21:10 PM »
Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue, not sure of the city at the moment I'm afraid.

Alan

Offline Arminius

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Re: Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2017, 02:27:19 PM »
Sideton Neokoron A - Side in Pamphylia.

Reference: SNG Copenhagen coll. 432

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2017, 03:51:17 PM »
 :applause: :applause:
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Overlord

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Re: Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2017, 04:11:44 PM »
To me, the surface look porous and the details somewhat soft. If this is normal for the type, what causes it and how does one distinguish it from casting (without examining the egde)?

I have a related question about some of the Roman silver coins I see online (Julius Caesar, Augustus, and Tiberius): they have a general appearance I'd describe as "aluminium-painted".

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2017, 04:47:31 PM »
Unfortunately, some of the DANGER! FAKE! signs can result from other causes. Fading detail may be sign of copying, or a sign of wear, including over-cleaning. It is pretty evident that this coin was over-cleaned recently. Indeed, inspecting the edge would be useful. A porous surface can be a sign of casting or of removed oxides. In view of the over-cleaning, I would go for the latter option.

I have a related question about some of the Roman silver coins I see online (Julius Caesar, Augustus, and Tiberius): they have a general appearance I'd describe as "aluminium-painted".

Hard to say without a picture and maybe even with a picture. It may be the light, it may be over-cleaning again. Fraudsters have learned to apply a chemical patina on their Romans, as some old geezers still consider patina as a mark of genuineness. A chemical patina can be rubbed off without much of an effort with your thumb. Sadly, a shiny-shiny classical coin is more likely to be mistreated and genuine. If you are not patient, a carefully controlled sulphur treatment (think of bad milk or rotten eggs) will speed up patina formation.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Arminius

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Re: Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2017, 06:31:39 PM »
To me, the surface look porous and the details somewhat soft. If this is normal for the type, what causes it and how does one distinguish it from casting (without examining the egde)?
...

Here we are at a state of discussion where experience is more important than theory.

These late provincials of Asia usually show a bad bronze quality.
Even extra fine til uncirculated pieces usually are porous and both sides are equally corroded showing small pits after 1700 years in humid soil. These genuine corrosion pits are evenly scattered at the surface and usually all small. But outlines and details usually are sharp, especially the edges. You may find many sharp details from die adjusting, dimples and so on.

Cast replicas with casting bubbles are very different - even after cleaning plus several years in collections like this piece. The best way to learn is to see as many genuine coins from that era as possible.

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Offline jsalgado

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Re: Cornelia Salonina, orichalcum (brass), provincial issue
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2017, 02:04:07 PM »
Arminius many thanks for your help.
I found this
http://www.fondazioneterradotranto.it/2013/09/20/la-seta-il-melogranola-melagrana-26/
it seems similar to my coin.