Author Topic: Gallienus  (Read 96 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Minimax88

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Gallienus
« on: April 20, 2017, 06:48:30 PM »
Gallienus, AR antoninianus, weight - 3.7g

Obv: IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG
Rev: VIRTVS AVGG

Can't find reference for this one (Mars / Virtus without shield or it's maybe scratched).
Any comment or opinion is helpful guys.

Offline Overlord

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 446
  • Tamdiu discendum est, quamdiu vivas
    • Overlord's stamp and coin collection
Re: Gallienus
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2017, 04:08:56 PM »
Couldn't find in Sear either. Do you see traces of the shield with the coin in hand (maybe under a magnifier)?

Offline Minimax88

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Re: Gallienus
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2017, 05:17:54 PM »
No traces of shield unfortunately. Could it be mint mistake? Or something else (worse)...

Offline Arminius

  • Procurator Caesaris
  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 968
  • Varus - may i show you our forest?
    • Arminius-Numismatics
Re: Gallienus
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2017, 12:17:46 PM »
Probably a flan defect or lack of material where the shield usually should be. Impurities may stick on parts of dies.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24 272
Re: Gallienus
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2017, 01:22:42 PM »
Yes, filled die looks like the most probable solution. There is a vague diagonal line running from where the hand should have been to the base Mars is standing on. A highly amusing coin. TFP.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Quant.Geek

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 652
Re: Gallienus
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2017, 04:22:20 PM »
I agree with Peter.  It most probably a filled-die that is quite common on Roman coins..
A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins