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Author Topic: Coin photography with an iPhone  (Read 664 times)

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Offline Overlord

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2017, 04:13:04 AM »
Coins that have too reflective a surface are difficult to photograph at times. Even in indirect sunlight, legends come out unreadable and fine details such as hair are not captured. In these circumstances, I find it helpful to place my palm between the coin and the sun.


Offline Overlord

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2017, 03:51:56 PM »
The CD spindle proved too small for Catherine the Great's massive 5 Kopek. A 15 lb macebell was an apt substitute! Will photograph it tomorrow as the daylight has faded.



Edit: Worked pretty well.  :)


« Last Edit: May 14, 2017, 07:56:02 AM by Overlord »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2017, 02:29:40 PM »
Needing light to come in at an angle, I used a white light torch to illuminate a copper coin. It came out blue. No amount of colour juggling could make it look like the original. In desperation, I turned the picture to greyscale mode. That resulted in the feared inversion effect: what is raised looks intaglio and vice versa. I got around that by colour inversion before going to greyscale. Lots of work, unsatisfactory result.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Overlord

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2017, 08:11:10 AM »
Try indirect sunlight, or "filtered" direct sunlight. You can use your palm to partly block sunlight in a way that gives the desired results.

My coin photography is now exclusively restricted to the iPhone. I need no post-processing apart from cropping the photo (on the iPhone iteself) and am able to upload it using the Photobucket app. The result is not as good as what you can achieve with a proper camera and lighting, but not bad either. It frees me from bulky cameras, tripods, memory cards, laptops, and post-processing software.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2017, 11:17:36 AM »
Yes, I use filtering as well as putting the coin at angle. I like to filter with one or more sheets of paper as necessary. I was just reporting that for the iPhone camera even white light is no good. Use natural light only.

I still use the scanner a lot. It is perfect for flat, clear coins. I use the iPhone for high relief coins, objects with a significant third dimension, glossy items, weak strikes and "see-through" plastic tokens. All the really difficult stuff.

The iPhone pics come out too heavy for WoC. There may be setting to fix that, but it'll forget to set it back. Instead, I use the opportunity to tweak them with lossy jpeg - often losing 80% of size without a visible effect on quality, a precision crop and juggling with contrast and lighting as necessary.

I am very happy indeed with the results. Anyone with a smart phone can do this.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Overlord

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2017, 11:31:31 AM »
The iPhone pics come out too heavy for WoC. There may be setting to fix that, but it'll forget to set it back.

Peter
I think there are free apps/websites that allow you to reduce image size. I use Photobucket so never really used one.

For me, the phone method doesn't work well for tiny coins, as the resulting image is often too small after cropping. For such coins, the extra megapixels of a regular camera come in handy.

Offline Levantiner

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2017, 03:19:16 PM »
I think there are free apps/websites that allow you to reduce image size. I use Photobucket so never really used one.

For me, the phone method doesn't work well for tiny coins, as the resulting image is often too small after cropping. For such coins, the extra megapixels of a regular camera come in handy.
I have seen on other forums people rave about theire smart phone coin pictures.  I view online coin pictures with a calibrated ( re- calibrated every month)  4 K monitor,  with such a monitor Smart phone pictures do not impress.