Author Topic: Norway 2 skilling 1659  (Read 631 times)

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Offline mrbadexample

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Norway 2 skilling 1659
« on: March 25, 2017, 12:58:07 AM »
Evening all.

I think I've got this pegged as KM # 30, but I can't work out what the listing in the SCWC refers to. There appears to be 3 varieties; 1659 (b), 1659 (b+ch) and 1659 (ch) but for the life of me I can't see what SCWC means by (b) and (ch).

Can someone help and tell me which one I've got? It'll be the cheap one (ch), obviously, but just in case... ;)

Thanks,
MBE

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Norway 2 skilling 1659
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2017, 12:23:20 PM »
According to my 5th edition, (c) stands for clover leaf on a hill - your version, while (b) is for bottle. Both are below the word DANSK and both are mintmaster signs of Frederik Gruner, the bottle being used 1651 - 1659 and the clover leaf on a hill 1659 - 1674. I presume ch is the same as c.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Norway 2 skilling 1659
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2017, 07:04:53 PM »
Thanks Peter - not sure why it doesn't give this information in my edition.

Told you it'd be the cheap one.  ;D

Offline Vincent

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Re: Norway 2 skilling 1659
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2019, 07:49:55 AM »
I got curious about this myself, and as I've got Holger Hede's catalogue at hand I looked it up. Holger Hede's catalogue of Danish coins since 1541, including Norwegian coins up to 1814, published by the Danish Numismatic Association (multiple editions), is the authoritative work, and the SCWC listings are based on it.

The marks found on the coins are mint masters' marks. The mint masters at Christiania responsible for this 2 skilling type were Peter Grüner (1643-1650) and his son Frederik Grüner (1651-1674). Peter Grüner used a symbol that resembles a clover, found on coins of 1649-1651. Frederik Grüner used a symbol that might be a bottle, found on coins of 1651-1659, and subsequently a flower (as on your coin), found on coins of 1659-1660. During 1660, mint master's marks ceased to be employed. There's a rare coin from 1659 on which Frederik Grüner has used both of his symbols on the same coin.