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Author Topic: Austrian 50 Schilling Set  (Read 698 times)

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Offline Prosit

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Re: Austrian 50 Schilling Set
« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2017, 05:08:20 PM »
That sort of thing happens more often than most people might think.

One similar that comes to mind is the Austrian 1964 10-Schilling.

It is difficult to get the regular issue coin. It is very easy to buy many advertised as 1964 regular issue but what you will get
often is a coin removed from a proof set. Some have been stuck in someone's pocket for a short time.
I have bought that coin 4 times and still not convinced I have the regular issue yet and not a slightly handled proof.

The entire proof set is cheaper than the regular issue in uncirculated condition.

Dale





...Don't know why, but I see the BU version of these coins...offered more frequently that the regular loose unc coins...


Aditya

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Austrian 50 Schilling Set
« Reply #16 on: April 05, 2017, 05:12:52 PM »
Is there a difference between the proof and business strikes? I don't mean the technique of striking them but a difference in design. If not, why would you care if it came out of a proof set?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Austrian 50 Schilling Set
« Reply #17 on: April 05, 2017, 05:25:00 PM »
Personally i don't know if there are any specific design elements different but I doubt it.

If I assume catalogs have any slight validity then the price difference listed between the two tends one to the conclusion that the difference between the coins manufacture
is important to many collectors and not just me.

For me knowing that a coin was intended to be use in everyday life is much more attractive and desirable than a proof or special set coin.
Why? Darn if I know but that is the way I feel about it.

The 1964 coins I have had in this specific case had much more sharpness and clarity of fields.
Maybe looking at one coin in hand a person wouldn't notice the difference.
But the difference is obvious when in a page with all the other dates surrounding it. 

Dale


Is there a difference between the proof and business strikes? I don't mean the technique of striking them but a difference in design. If not, why would you care if it came out of a proof set?

Peter