Author Topic: Comments on: "Jody Clark, coin designer"  (Read 919 times)

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Offline <k>

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Comments on: "Jody Clark, coin designer"
« on: March 10, 2017, 02:01:55 PM »
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Jody Clark, Coin Designer



When Jody Clark introduced his new effigy of the Queen for the UK coinage, I asked the Royal Mint a question, via their Facebook. I mentioned that the the designer of the two previous UK effigies, IRB and Maklouf, also produced uncouped versions of the effigies for special occasions. Uncouped means that the effigies are not cut off at the neck but instead include the shoulders. I asked the Mint whether Jody Clark had also produced an uncouped effigy, but the Mint replied that it would not comment on matters to do with the Commonwealth, as these were confidential.

Anyway, now we know. Mr Clark's uncouped effigy is in fact an entirely stand-alone effigy and not and extension of his UK effigy. Maklouf's uncouped effigy appeared on some of the previous circulation coins of Gibraltar, and IRB's uncouped effigy appeared on the collector coins of the uninhabited (or not permanently inhabited) overseas territories, such as BAT and BIOT.

 
« Last Edit: August 01, 2018, 07:55:32 PM by <k> »
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Offline Alan71

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Re: Comments on: "Jody Clark, coin designer"
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2017, 06:39:49 PM »
I'm glad that Gibraltar are changing their portrait.  To me, it seemed a backward step to adopt the Maklouf uncouped in 2004 after using the Rank-Broadley (uncouped) for six years.

Jody Clark would definitely win the prize for most handsome designer of the Queen's coin portraits, wouldn't he?   :)

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on: "Jody Clark, coin designer"
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2017, 06:50:15 PM »
I'm glad that Gibraltar are changing their portrait.  To me, it seemed a backward step to adopt the Maklouf uncouped in 2004 after using the Rank-Broadley (uncouped) for six years.

No, Gibraltar's circulation coins never used IRB uncouped version. It was always the couped version - no shoulders.

 
« Last Edit: March 11, 2017, 12:00:26 AM by <k> »
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Offline Bimat

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Comments on: "Jody Clark, coin designer"
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2017, 06:33:34 AM »
Royal Mint designer reveals he was told to 'de-bling' the Queen by removing her diamond encrusted necklace from latest coin portrait

By Alexander Robertson For Mailonline
PUBLISHED: 15:38 BST, 15 August 2017 | UPDATED: 18:32 BST, 15 August 2017

The Queen was deliberately 'de-blinged' for her latest coin portrait after she had her diamond-encrusted necklace removed, it has been revealed.

Jody Clark, 36, has revealed the secret omission from his design that appears on every British coin minted since 2015.

His original portrait was eventually approved by the Queen and Mint officials - but not before the Coronation necklace was removed from around her neck.

When the suggestion of a new portrait was suggested for 2015, Jody submitted his own drawing and was amazed when he was told his version had been chosen.

His original design included her crown, pearl drop earrings and Victorian necklace worn for official state functions.

But he was told to axe the necklace from his final design. He revealed: 'I got to dress her up in what I thought would work best.

'I researched what she wears and when she wears it and decided to go for the crown she generally wears to state openings and state visits, as I thought that was quite appropriate.

'It took me about a week to sketch the design and put it on the computer, and another week and a bit for the 3D model.'

It was sent to the Queen and Chancellor of the Exchequer before going back to the Royal Mint Advisory committee - a panel of experts from sculpture, architecture, history and art.

And after crowning his design the winner, they suggested some changes including removing the necklace.

He said: 'I agreed with taking the necklace off, it makes for a neater design.'

The necklace first worn by Queen Victoria contains 26 giant diamonds set in silver, gold and platinum.

Queen Elizabeth II received the coronation necklace when she came to the throne and can be seen in photos adorned with the 11.25 carat jewels on her neck.

The 26th diamond sits on a pedant suspended from the necklace and is 22.48 carats.

Jody, who is the youngest ever to design the effigy, won a competition just one year after starting work at the Royal Mint.

Jody, based at the Royal Mint in Llantrisant, South Wales, is only the fifth coin designer since the Queen took to the throne in 1952.

The artist, of Bowness on Windermere in the Lake District, said: 'The Queen had to face a certain way, generally in profile because that works best.

'I also looked online to find pictures of her in a more natural setting. I wanted to add just a little bit of warmth to her expression, not quite smiling, but just a subtle upturn of the lips.'

Father-of-one Jody said: 'I got an email through from the Royal Office which just said 'Design H has been approved', so I think that means she liked it.

'To this day, I don't introduce myself as the man who designed the Queen's head, although my friends or family normally jump in and say it now to embarrass me.'

Source: Daily Mail

Image Captions: The Queen was deliberately 'de-blinged' from her latest portrait (first image) on millions of British coins by removing her diamond encrusted necklace, (second image), it has been revealed
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.