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Author Topic: Currencies with "new" in their name  (Read 454 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Currencies with "new" in their name
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2017, 06:51:54 PM »
Hmm, I had thought "yeni" meant thousand, for some reason. Anyway, I am nominating you for the Nobel Prize for Knowing the Most Words For "New" in Different Languages.   8)

Offline chrisild

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Re: Currencies with "new" in their name
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2017, 07:46:47 PM »
In fact they did that before. :) You may have seen coins with a "bin lira" denomination, like this one (image from gutefrage.net):



Well, that is a 250,000 lira piece; bin = thousand. (And those words that mean "new" do indeed go back to some common Indo-European root. In Europe you will find "non-n" words among the usual suspects, languages such as Finnish, Hungarian, or Basque.)

Brazil is a strange mix by the way. After a long period of Real coins, they introduced the Cruzeiro in 1942. That was replaced by the New Cruzeiro in 1967; three years later the word "New" was dropped. In 1986 the Cruzado came, followed by the New Cruzado three years later. As far as I know, these Cruzado Novo coins are the only ones that actually feature the word "novo".



(BCB/central bank image.) 1990, another Cruzeiro. 1993, the Cruzeiro Real, and (since 1994) the Real again.

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Currencies with "new" in their name
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2017, 08:02:55 PM »
Then Turkey binned the "bin". Logical.  ;)

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Currencies with "new" in their name
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2017, 08:23:50 PM »
Is there any word for "new" that does not begin with "n"?

Turkish, as noted: yeni.

It is not a coincidence that apart from Turkish all the languages noted thus far in this thread (English, Portuguese, Spanish, French, Hindi) are Indo-European, and all have an N-word for new.

In Finnish new is uusi but AFAIK when the markka was revalued it didn't explicitly say "new" on the new coins.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Currencies with "new" in their name
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2017, 08:33:43 PM »
There was a fashion in the 16th and 17th century to put MONETA NOVA (of place name) on the coins. The one below is a shilling from Reval (now Tallinn) from 1535; NOVA is mostly obliterated by the hole but it reads MONETA NOVA REVAL.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Currencies with "new" in their name
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2017, 08:35:17 PM »
And another, a liard from Ličge in the name of Bishop Louis (1456-1482) which reads MONETA NOVA FACTA HASS.