Author Topic: Unrealised designs that later became coins  (Read 367 times)

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Offline <k>

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Unrealised designs that later became coins
« on: February 09, 2017, 04:33:40 PM »
The designs on the reverse of Australia's first decimal coins, issued in 1966, were created by Stuart Devlin. Below is one design that was not chosen for the set. It depicted a mother kangaroo carrying a "joey" in her pouch.

Offline <k>

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2017, 04:34:33 PM »
In 2017, the design was issued as a 2 cent collector coin.

Offline <k>

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2017, 04:42:13 PM »
Robert-Ralph Carmichael died in July 2016:

OBITUARY: Robert-Ralph Carmichael created the art on Canada’s loonie

Source: The Globe and Mail.

Extracts:

Robert-Ralph Carmichael’s artwork is handled by millions of people in Canada every day. His iconic image of a common loon swimming in front of an island graces the dollar coin affectionately known as “the loonie.” But, if it hadn’t been for a mysterious disappearance on the way to the Royal Canadian Mint’s production facility in Winnipeg, the dollar would feature a voyageur in a canoe and not Mr. Carmichael’s aquatic bird.

In 1978, having already submitted several designs to the Mint, Mr. Carmichael sent his rendering of a loon. In an interview with the Toronto Star, he said, “I thought it was such a beautiful shape that it would be a good design. I think anyone who knows the loon is going to have positive vibrations about it. It symbolizes a lot of things we’re going to lose if we’re not careful.”

Mr. Carmichael’s loon design might have remained unnoticed in the Mint’s repository for years, but something inexplicable happened. After a two-year phase out that began in 1985, one-dollar bank notes were scheduled to be replaced by a coin. It was the most significant change to Canada’s monetary system in more than 50 years. The new coin was supposed to feature a voyageur in a canoe on the reverse side of Queen Elizabeth. But both sides of the master dies vanished during transport from Ottawa to Winnipeg. Someone at the Mint had decided to save some money by sending the package with a local courier company rather than a secure armoured vehicle. Master dies were usually sent separately to prevent them from falling into the hands of counterfeiters; one side being useless without the other. In this instance, however, the two dies were packaged together and clearly labelled “Canadian Mint.” They were picked up on Nov. 3, 1986, but 11 days later had failed to arrive in Winnipeg. The RCMP investigated, but never solved the case of the missing dies. They conjectured the package never left Ottawa. Possibly, it now resides in somebody’s basement or attic.

Given the imminent danger of counterfeit, creating a replacement coin was of utmost importance. Mr. Carmichael’s loon, submitted almost 10 years earlier, fit nicely with other forms of wildlife – such as the beaver and caribou – in circulation on nickels and quarters. The federal government rapidly authorized the go-ahead. Mr. Carmichael was notified.

“Bob never got excited about anything,” Ms. Keatley said. Nevertheless, Mr. Carmichael was proud of his work. His initials RRC can be seen on the coin just above the waterline. Early in his career he’d decided to hyphenate his two given names to distinguish himself from other artists named Robert Carmichael. Despite the public’s embrace of the term “loonie,” Mr. Carmichael always referred to it as, “The one-dollar loon coin.”






Does anybody have an image of Mr Carmichael's original artwork?

Offline <k>

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2017, 04:53:09 PM »
In the late 1960s, Christopher Ironside produced a reverse design for the proposed decimal 50 pence that showed the lion and the unicorn, symbolising England and Scotland. The Duke of Edinburgh, who was President of the Royal Mint Advisory Committee at the time, greatly admired the design and thought it far superior to the 50p design that was actually issued.

The Royal Mint produced the design as a special circulating 50 pence coin in 2013, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Christopher Ironside. The only difference was the replacement of "NEW" with "FIFTY" in the legend. Click on the link below to read more about it:

2013 Christopher Ironside 50p



See also: UK Pattern 50p

Offline <k>

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2017, 05:13:19 PM »






Australia, $1 silver, 2004.   Wombat.  Design by Stuart Devlin.

Originally this was a trial design, considered for the circulation dollar back in 1984, but the Royal Australian Mint eventually released a collector version of the design.



See also: Trial designs for the 1984 Australian dollar.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2017, 12:20:58 PM »
In 2010 Germany issued a €10 collector coin to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the GDR states joining the Federal Republic, and thus 20 years of German unity. Back then, the designer Erich Ott won the competition, and coins with a map of Germany and the words "Wir sind ein Volk" (we are one people) came out. Image: VfS/German Numismatic Office.

Christian

Offline chrisild

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2017, 12:23:43 PM »
Five years later Germany commemorated, surprise, the 25th anniversary. But instead of having a new design competition, the design that had won the second prize before, by Bernd Wendhut, was picked for a €25 silver collector coin (a unique denomination so far, and the only one in Ag 999), and also a commemorative €2 coin. It features people in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, and three times the "Wir sind ..." motto.

This is the 25 euro coin (image: Federal Ministry of Finance website). The only changes that were made affected the date and face value on the eagle side, and the number of years on the other side.

Christian

Offline chrisild

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2017, 12:29:45 PM »
The €2 coin has the common reverse of course. So the year was moved to the side with the people and the gate. (Image from the Ministry of Finance again.)

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2017, 12:32:37 PM »
I think it represents all the angry unemployed designers who wanted a new competition.  >:D

Offline chrisild

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2017, 01:10:30 PM »
Quite possibly so, hehe. Wendhut's design is, on one hand, more "dynamic" than Ott's map, and I like that. On the other hand the 2010 map illustrated, quite appropriately, an event or process that had to do with the entire country, not just a few people standing in front of some gate in Berlin. ;) Had the government issued a whole series about the 1989/1990 events - e.g. demos in Leipzig and elsewhere, fall of the Wall and open borders, GDR adopting the Deutsche Mark, United Germany - , the gate/people would have been fine for a Gate Opening (Dec-1989) coin. Oh well. Maybe in 2020 there will be another Einheit coin, this time with a competition as usual again ...

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2017, 01:51:34 PM »
The figures in combination with the text reminds me of the conventional symbol of a broadcasting radio mast: an Eiffel tower like structure with concentric circles at the top. I can see the design as telling the story of a message being sent.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.


Offline <k>

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2017, 05:12:27 PM »
From the Royal Canadian Mint:

Design:

All three coins feature the unused circulation coin designs intended to commemorate Canada's Diamond Jubilee in 1927. Working with the original sketches (and little else), the Royal Canadian Mint's engravers set out to interpret each artist's vision as though the art had been entrusted to them today, to mark Confederation's 150th anniversary. The 90-year-old concepts have been painstakingly adapted for modern engraving techniques—including a reverse proof finish that allows the more brilliant engraved elements to shine bright against the matte backdrop.

One-cent coin design:

The one-cent coin features an Art Nouveau-inspired design by Canadian artist Gustav Hahn (1866-1962), with a bough of maple leaves encircling the commemorative dates "1867-2017".

Five-cent coin design:

The five-cent coin by Canadian artist J.E.H. MacDonald (1873-1932) features a crowned lion gripping a maple leaf as it stands perched on a rock, which represents the changing Canadian landscape cradled by the sea; beneath the forepaw is Canada's motto, "A MARI USQUE AD MARE" ("From Sea to Sea"), while the commemorative dates "1867" and "2017" are inscribed beside the lion.

25-cent coin design:
A second design by MacDonald graces the reverse of the 25-cent coin, and centres on a soaring view of the iconic Peace Tower on Parliament Hill. The clock tower soars high above the clouds and is surrounded by a ribbon-wrapped laurel of leaves, from which hangs four bells—an ode to the Dominion Carillon, which was inaugurated on July 1, 1927, during the Diamond Jubilee festivities. Each bell bears engraved numbers that combine to form the commemorative dates "2017" and "1867".

Did you know…

Gustav Hahn (1866-1962) may not be well-known to coin collectors, but his brother certainly is: Emanuel Hahn (1881-1957) is the artist behind the iconic caribou design on Canada's 25-cent circulation coin, the Bluenose on our 10-cent coin, and the Voyageur design of the original silver dollar.

Hahn is credited as a pioneer of the Art Nouveau style in Canada, where his murals are found in several public buildings—most famously the Ontario Legislature and Old City Hall in Toronto.

James Edward Hervey (J.E.H.) MacDonald (1873-1932) was one of the founding members of the famed Group of Seven, which represents the first national art movement in Canada.

Live coverage of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations in Ottawa marked Canada's first-ever coast-to-coast broadcast. On July 1, 1927, telephone and telegraph companies joined forces with radio stations to broadcast speeches and songs from Parliament Hill—including the inaugural peals of the Peace Tower's carillon bells, which are alluded to in the 25-cent coin design.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 11:48:46 PM by <k> »

Offline onecenter

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Re: Unrealised designs that later became coins
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2017, 11:29:08 PM »
Just beautiful coins.  I like them very much.  Quality befitting Canada and the Royal Canadian Mint.
Mark