Author Topic: A new interesting issue from New Zealand  (Read 3655 times)

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Austrokiwi

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A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« on: July 31, 2009, 12:08:07 PM »
I for one have been disappointed with the NCLT issues coming out of New Zealand the last few years.  However finally an issue that, to me at least, makes numismatic sense has been produced.  It has been described to me by one expert as a souvenir issue, but even as such it seems to me the coin is a better fit in a New Zealand pre-decimal and decimal collection than other recent issues. 

The coin is a $1 cupro-nickel issue celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand.  There is at least one "funny" with the coin: the reverse design is that used on the pre-decimal 1 penny coin, a tui (A native nectar feeding song bird) that was first issued with the date 1940 ( reserve Bank was established in 1934) though the first examples ( as advised by Martin) were produced in 1939. The coin has a total mintage of 2000, of which 500 will be for the reserve banks use (I assume as presentation pieces) and only 1500 will be available for world wide sale.

http://stamps.nzpost.co.nz/NR/exeres/F55C3C01-EC64-4AAC-B200-4AB7CD6F5E34,frameless.htm?NRMODE=Published

Galapagos

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2009, 01:47:23 PM »
I do like the tui design. The penny was big enough - this 39mm issue is too bulky for my liking.

The Australians had a similar issue back in the 1990s, showing the portrait on a 50c piece of the prize ram that used to appear on their shilling.

Offline Bimat

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2009, 05:02:15 PM »
I can't understand-How can New Zealand post issue coins for Reserve bank of New Zealand? ::) This applies to the current circulatory coins too or only for pseudo issues?
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Austrokiwi

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2009, 05:51:15 PM »
I can't understand-How can New Zealand post issue coins for Reserve bank of New Zealand? ::) This applies to the current circulatory coins too or only for pseudo issues?
Martin may be able to elaborate further.  All coins, circulation and pseudo issues, were  until a few years ago issued by the reserve bank. However the reserve bank found issuing NCLT coins problematic and outside its core business so the reserve bank licenced New Zealand post to issue the pseudo coins.  All issues are still approved of by the reserve bank.

For some collectors this has been problematic, NZ post administration, by their own admission don't know much about numismatics and have,IMHO, equated the production and selling of coins to that of stamps.  Some of the coin issues that have come out recently are strong evidence of this, the giants coin issue of this year complimented a stamp issue, and it was very clear from the design of the coins that the designer and NZ post worked from paper designs as opposed to the more three dimensional plaster models. The resultant designs on the reverse are flat and stamp like. This latest issue is the first that seems to have focussed on numismatics.

translateltd

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2009, 09:09:02 PM »
Ian has largely summarised it.  The RB still issues the circulating coins, and NZP does the NCLT, subject to approval from the RB in each case.  It gets weird when special "tourist sets" are compiled from circulating coins and issued in packaging by NZP.  What happens from a collector's perspective, though, is that no-one is prepared to take responsibility for issuing circulating commemoratives, as NZP says they're circulating coins and the RB says they don't do commemoratives ...

Also agree that our most recent NCLT items appear to have been conceived almost as stamp designs, as they tend to be very two-dimensional and don't take full advantage of the opportunities that a coin surface offers.  The "tuatara" $5 was particularly bad, and even this year's "kakapo" looks a bit soapy.


Offline Figleaf

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2009, 11:40:14 AM »
And what's the role of the New Zealand Mint in all this?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2009, 12:06:27 PM »
And what's the role of the New Zealand Mint in all this?

Peter

None whatsoever - it has no contract to strike coins for New Zealand.  Despite the misleadingly official-sounding name, it's a private entity, just like Perth, Pobjoy, Franklin, etc.



Offline Figleaf

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2009, 02:46:40 PM »
OK, put them where they belong. With the Franklin Mint, the Commonwealth Mint, the London Mint and the other peppermint producers.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2009, 06:18:31 PM »
NZ government doesn't have its own mint? :o
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Austrokiwi

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2009, 06:34:05 PM »
New Zealand didn't have its own money till 1933!

translateltd

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Re: A new interesting issue from New Zealand
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2009, 09:04:34 PM »
NZ government doesn't have its own mint? :o

No - we contract out to various mints around the world.  I believe it's by tender, which is why the mint changes almost every year, with subtle differences in die detail as a consequence.  This year is something of a 'first', as the uncirculated sets have been produced by the Perth Mint.  They've done NCLT issues for us before, but never a full collector set with all denominations.


BC Numismatics

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A new interesting issue from New Zealand.
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2009, 01:38:16 AM »
And what's the role of the New Zealand Mint in all this?

Peter

Peter,
  The New Zealand Mint strikes medal-coins for the Cook Islands & Fiji.

The New Zealand Mint has a huge complex in which a prominent coin dealer in Auckland will be moving into under an agreement - Peter Eccles,whom I know very well.

Yes,the New Zealand Mint will be allowing guided tours of the plant,especially for those who are interested in the minting process,even though what is being struck are medal-coins.

Aidan.