Author Topic: Advancing as a collector  (Read 7632 times)

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BC Numismatics

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2009, 10:52:00 PM »
Phil,
  The last year for British silver coins was 1946.1947 was the first year for cupro-nickel coins.

Aidan.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2009, 11:06:08 PM »
I agree, a person doesn't "have to" sell stuff because it no longer fits into your collection.  However, consdolidating my collections, selling off or trading no longer wanted stuff would provide funds to explore other areas, make room and maybe bring a little more order.  That is attractive to me.

For many years I was a series collector.  For instance, I have every year and every mint-mark of the Jefferson Nickel in uncirculated condition from 1938-2003...146 examples, (no proof) some not so cheap in that condition.  I did the same for the Kennedy half-dollar and SBA dollar and several other US series.  I did the kennedy set like five times over the years.  I have fairly well complete set of US Washington quarters in unc, 1932-1998, again no proofs (missing a few of the more expensive ones of course).  I have Canadian cents complete 1924-2006 and 21 pre-1924.  Also have pretty much every coin minted by Austria since 1892 and many prior to that.

While I would probably keep many of the above since those series are complete or nearly so, I am no longer very interested in collecting like that.  Even if I kept those I have thousands of other items, many not even catalogued, just sitting in boxes.  I have hundres if not a thousand duplicate Austrian good luck tokens.

Sometimes if I want to show an image here I have to look for it up to an hour  ;D before I find it.  I think a little house cleaning and a new focus for me would go hand in hand very well.

Oh I forgot  ;D  have almost a complete set in uncirculated and proof US modern psuedo coins.  A lot of Austria's psuedo coin output as well.  Many of those it wouldn't bother me to let someone else have a chance to enjoy them  ;D

I firmly believe there is no wrong way to collect coins and every one should do so in the manner that best suits themself.
Just not sure what that means to me at the moment  :)

Dale
« Last Edit: July 27, 2009, 11:07:39 PM by dalehall »

BC Numismatics

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2009, 12:23:24 AM »
Interestingly,'IND. IMP.' was also on the British 1948 coins as well,but not on the 1948 coins of any other British Commonwealth country.

Aidan.

 
« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 09:56:24 PM by <k> »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2009, 12:41:48 AM »
I have thousands of other items, many not even catalogued, just sitting in boxes.  I have hundres if not a thousand duplicate Austrian good luck tokens.

Sometimes if I want to show an image here I have to look for it up to an hour  ;D before I find it.  I think a little house cleaning and a new focus for me would go hand in hand very well.

That's an altogether different problem and now I also understand better why you don't take out coins to look at any more. The simple solution is albums. Once you have decided what to collect, you start setting up albums. I find albums in the waste of big offices. All I need to do is show an interest and they take out the paper and give them. Just make sure they are of the four ring type. Two rings won't hold heavy coin pages. I have more albums then I can use. Other requirements are album pages and coin holders - they are cheap if you buy a lot at once - and something to make labels on the back of the album (I use one of those Dyno contraptions, but I have seen very fancy computer-operated devices also).

The trick is to get started. Make a mess on a table you need, so you must clean it up quickly. Collect duplicates in plastic bags (I like to use the ones they sell hashish in, they're free) that go back in the boxes you use now, get the rest in the holders and the holders in albums. Now you can find what you're looking for and taking out a coin to look at it is no big deal any more. As a bonus, you can start trading away or selling off duplicates.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #19 on: July 28, 2009, 04:04:07 AM »
.....The simple solution is albums. Once you have decided what to collect, you start setting up albums.......
The trick is to get started......As a bonus, you can start trading away or selling off duplicates.

Peter

I have 14, 4 inch thick 3-ring D-style binders and 7 Dansco Albums and 7 Whitman style albums.  I have nearly a unlimited supply of binders and quite a few emptys floating around.  Like you I get them given to me from offices after the paper is removed.  The binders each cost about $20 US new so getting them free is a great help.

I did spend a lot of time on the Austrian New Year tokens and think I have all the varieties separated and nearly completed a pdf catalogue of them.

You are right, I should do more of that  ;D

Dale

Offline lehmansterms

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #20 on: August 09, 2009, 05:25:49 PM »
Too much repetition can cause that. I am going to spend some time with my magnifying glass looking through the rest of the bag of coins... it is fun to find something so special and so old.
Ginger

This, I believe, is why we're seeing a major uptick in interest in coin-areas like Greek, Roman Provincial, Medieval and "Eastern Cultures", etc, in recent years.
We're about 10 years out from the time the internet and easy availability of inexpensive uncleaned Late Roman AE's hove upon the scene, big-time, and created, what? thousands? tens of thousands? of new "Classical Numismatists". 

Ten years, in my experience, is just about long enough for any beginner to have adequately mastered (or given-up on) cleaning and gotten one's fill of "FEL TEMP's" and "GLORIA EX's". This therefore tends to be the point at which folks will look for a change.

Some may give up or "temporarily put-away" the hobby for lack of interest adequate to justify the expenditure. Others may specialize in some field, aspect or niche, or move on into a different area of the hobby altogether.  For some, this will mean dealing in coins on some level - for others, populating a website is a challenge more suited to their skill-set.  Perhaps becoming more expert in photography or volunteering to speak about ancient coins and cultures in schools will be attractive as the next step.  But the point is, we all come to the point, eventually,  where we realize that it's time to take the next step.

One of the most popular of next steps is, in my experience as an "old timer", an interest in working with the sorts of coins which may have been seen as "too much of a challenge" in years past.  When one has overcome the challenge at hand - becoming proficient at attributing Roman coins on which the legends have not survived in readable condition, or completed a type-set or a series collection to the your personal satisfaction, then it's time to look around for new challenges. At this time, perhaps Greek coins with their small or non-existent inscriptions will appeal as a further development of the hobby - as may branching out into areas which do not use the Roman Alphabet at all.

So what I'm saying here is that if you're not getting quite the same thrill from your involvement with ancient coins, you should probably look for something more challenging to pique your interest.  That's both the greatest ultimate draw and finally, possibly the greatest frustration inherent to numismatics - there is always another field to delve into, so much so that no one person could ever manage to know and experience it all.

Mark

Offline MS

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2009, 08:38:18 AM »
Personally I don't think I would want to collect the elusive and expensive modern Indian coin because I can't justify spending such large sums of money. 

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2009, 01:21:36 PM »
Personally I don't think I would want to collect the elusive and expensive modern Indian coin.

That is one of the great things bout collecting. You decide yourself what you collect. You can adapt your collection to your personal taste, budget and circumstances. If you enjoy the chase and the details, the rumours and discussions as in this thread, you were made to collect by date and mintmark. Just watch out for the "completeness" trap. While it looks like an approach where you could have a "complete" collection, there will always be a new variety, discovery or error to look for. Anyway, the point of collecting is having fun, not being complete.

The other extreme is collecting by type. The advantage of this approach is that your money will buy a whole lot more coins and you will build a collection that is more "accessible" for non-collectors. It's up to you. In the case of India, my approach has been to collect by type, but if a different mintmark or variety comes my way, I don't complain and put it right in the collection.

I can suggest a third type of collection, that will allow you to expand your collection and gain depth quickly. I call it timeline collecting. Try getting one coin (any type) from each Mughal ruler, then slowly work back in time and start including local rulers, maybe first from the area where you live. You'll be surprised at how cheap and effective this approach is.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2009, 01:55:42 PM »
Peter,
Indian numismatics is indeed full of surprises. I was originally into collecting only British India and Independent India coins. Next were bank Notes. Then I started,as you mentioned, one coin of each Mughal Ruler. I thought I could do it. But unless you have really deep pockets, it is almost impossible. I missed the short lived rulers. Since I could not complete the rulers list, I thought, why not different types - different couplets. This was also difficult. In the end, I got so engrossed, I thought, one coin of each mint. There are so many, that I could not. So I said to myself-well if not one each of all mints, at least one of each mint of each major ruler of the area (Gujarat) where I stay. In the end, I am aimlessly collecting all mughal coins that come my way. On the way, I learnt from Oesho that quite a few local princely states issued coins in the name of th Mughal monarch. That got me hooked onto the IPS collection.  Then I opened a box of Sultanate coins which I had picked up as a kid. That got me into the sultanate coins. I am not sure now where I am headed except for the fact that I do intend some day to own a collection which is reasonably complete. I do not think it is possible with Mughal, Sultanates or States. Hence I tried my luck with modern Indian coins. However, I have greatly enjoyed collecting and have learnt a lot. 
(I am not sure if these posts are relevent to the topic and it may be better if they are split into a different topic) 

Amit
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Offline MS

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2009, 02:04:35 PM »
Quote from: Figleaf
You can adapt your collection to your personal taste, budget and circumstances.
So far in the last couple of months that exactly what I have done. I look out only for circulation coins and trade them for coins I don't have. If I find coins that are UNC or AU then I am thrilled but I don't go out of my way to spend so that a UNC can be acquired. The idea is that once I have all the coins I want, over a period of time, I can always improve their grades. Living in India and wanting to collect Indian coins mint wise and year wise makes collecting that much easier. For the budget, I have a rough idea on how much I want to spend in a month and hope not to exceed that budget.

Quote from: Figleaf
Just watch out for the "completeness" trap.
;D Yes I think I am falling into that trap already. I have '06, '07, '08 10 Rupee and now I want a '05. I know its expensive comparatively but my point is that I don't want to shell out $2000 in any circumstances for a 2 Rupee coin allegedly with a mintage of only 150. I know a lot of things that I could do with $2000 to improve my lifestyle and a two rupee coin is not going to be give me that. 

Another thing that I infer about completeness is that a lot of it is about how much patience you have as a collector. Do you have the ability to wait for the right opportunity? I am guessing people with patience end up as better numismatists or at the very least less poorer for it. Patience is not one of my stronger qualities LOL but I hope coin collecting will teach me a thing or two.

Quote from: Figleaf
I can suggest a third type of collection, that will allow you to expand your collection and gain depth quickly. I call it timeline collecting. Try getting one coin (any type) from each Mughal ruler, then slowly work back in time and start including local rulers, maybe first from the area where you live. You'll be surprised at how cheap and effective this approach is.

That is a great idea and something I have in mind. The problem with coin collection is that you there is so much approaches. I thought about world coins, commems, Indian coins, British Indian coins. In the end I know I am collecting Indian coins because that's what I want the most. I am in my 30s. The coins with which I used to run across the street as a kid and buy candies are no longer there. Instead, I am left with FSS every which way I look. And I don't like any of them.

My plan is go backwards, start collecting ROI and once I hit a saturation point, go after BI and other European Indian coins. My main reason for not thinking about going further back than that is lack of knowledge about these coins and to understand their authenticity. Its easy in India to go to some rustic little tourist spot outside an ancient temple or a fort and find coin peddlers dumping fakes on you. As you rightly said, coin collecting is all about having fun and that is something I am enjoying in high doses. Almost everyday I find out things and learn that I didnt previously know.

MS

Offline Bimat

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #25 on: August 18, 2009, 03:19:31 PM »

The other extreme is collecting by type. The advantage of this approach is that your money will buy a whole lot more coins and you will build a collection that is more "accessible" for non-collectors. It's up to you. In the case of India, my approach has been to collect by type, but if a different mintmark or variety comes my way, I don't complain and put it right in the collection.
I am in favor of this type of collection.Let me give you my own example.When I started collecting Euro coins,my ultimate aim was to collect them by mint,which I thought that it will not be so difficult.But soon,realized that it's really difficult,especially when you are in India.Just in case of German Euro coins ,they have 5 mints and my want list of German coins had not less than 65 coins ::) As he said,If I come across any mint variety,I would rather accept it,but I'm not crazy for it.And now,I have a pretty decent collection of Euro coins :)

@ KR,
There are so many stories about the 1992 commemorative.It's mintage is believed to be less than 500.(The coin was 'released' by our current Agricultural minister Sharad Pawar ) but I really do not consider it as a coin.The Calcutta mint website mentions this coin as 'Uncirculated' but I know at-least one collector who has this coin.(The coin was to all  those who attended the event in 1992 as a souvenir).After all,it's up to you..What should I collect and what not...

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline a3v1

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #26 on: August 18, 2009, 04:28:52 PM »
Let me give you my own example.When I started collecting Euro coins,my ultimate aim was to collect them by mint,which I thought that it will not be so difficult.But soon,realized that it's really difficult,especially when you are in India.Just in case of German Euro coins ,they have 5 mints and my want list of German coins had not less than 65 coins ::)
Aditya,
Being an European living within the EU makes things so much easier! ;) My collection of Euro coins is both by mint and by date and now counts over 1450 coins, including some 425 bi-metallic 1€ and 2€ coins.
On the other hand: The only Indian coins I ever see are in pictures on this forum. ;D
Regards,
a3v1
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2009, 06:48:02 PM »
MS,see reply# 25 by Mark.
Aditya,
Being an European living within the EU makes things so much easier! ;) My collection of Euro coins is both by mint and by date and now counts over 1450 coins, including some 425 bi-metallic 1€ and 2€ coins.
On the other hand: The only Indian coins I ever see are in pictures on this forum. ;D
Regards,
a3v1
Hats off to you,man! I certainly can not think of collecting Euro coins by date,but I'm sure I'll complete it by type some day.it's nearly 55% complete now (Excluding those of Vatican,San Marino and Monaco,obviously ;D)Not too bad for an Indian collector :)
« Last Edit: August 18, 2009, 07:23:12 PM by numismatica »
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Kid Romeo

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Re: Advancing as a collector
« Reply #28 on: August 18, 2009, 06:49:39 PM »
If I may suggest another collection type about which I have read an article by Mitch Sanders which appeared in ANA magazine 'Numismatist'. It's called 'Concentrated Collection'. I tried to attach the PDF of the article but it exceeds the size limit.
So here are the excerpts:

EVERY COIN collection
is unique, reflecting
its owner’s individual
approach to the
hobby. But while
there is considerable
diversity in what numismatists
collect, decisions about how to
collect generally focus on two well established
methods. A type collection
includes representative examples from
many different coin series, while
a date/mintmark collection aspires
to completeness within a single series.
Though different in focus—the breadth
of type collecting contrasts with the
depth of date/mintmark collecting—
they both have an important place
in numismatics.

A type collection provides a broad
overview of numismatics—20thcentury
U.S. coins, small cents, dimes,
Seated Liberty coins, or pieces produced
at the Carson City Mint—and typically
contains a single example of each design
type within the scope of the set. For instance,
a basic type set of 20th-century
half dollars would have a Barber,
Franklin, Walking Liberty and two
Kennedys (one with a standard reverse,
and one with a Bicentennial reverse).
Within a particular series, type sets
usually account for significant changes.
For example, at various times Kennedy
halves were 90-percent silver, 40-percent
silver or copper-nickel, and each
alloy is eligible for inclusion in a type
set. Also, major design subtypes, such
as the Lincoln cent’s Wheat and Lincoln
Memorial reverses, usually are
represented with separate coins. Minor
modifications in design or composition
also might be included, depending on
the collector’s preferences.
Assembling a type set generally is
very economical, both in terms of effort
and expenditure, because the coins chosen
from each series are entirely up to
you. If you’re seeking a Lincoln cent for
a type set of cents, small cents, 20thcentury
issues or coins portraying
Presidents, the common 1944 will serve
just as well as the rare 1909-S VDB.

Date/mintmark collecting, on the
other hand, enables you to pursue a
particular interest in detail by acquiring
every combination within a specific
coin series. This approach is more expansive—
as well as more expensive—
than type collecting. Not only are there
many more coins to collect, but sooner
or later, a date/mintmark collector will
encounter “key” dates, like the scarce
1916-D Mercury dime. Every date/
mintmark set also involves choices
about whether to include collector-only
issues like recent S-mint proofs, or
die varieties such as the 1955 doubled die
cent.

Your particular collecting approach
likely will depend on the interaction of
interest and budget. Series with many
inexpensive issues, such as Jefferson
nickels or Roosevelt dimes, generally are
good candidates for date/mintmark collecting.
For series that are more elusive,
or not currently major interests, you
might be satisfied with a single example
of the type.

However, there is a middle-of-the road
approach between the breadth of a
type set and the depth of a date/
mintmark set that I call “concentrated
collecting.” This kind of collection contains
one example from each decade of a
series’ lifespan, and one example from
every mint that struck them. Concentrated
collections are compact, because
the same coin can represent both a
decade and a mint.

Take the Morgan dollar, for example.
A date/mintmark collection has more
than 100 pieces, which can be quite
daunting to complete. On the other
hand, acquiring only a single example
might not seem sufficient for such
a sprawling series. A concentrated collection
falls between these extremes,
capturing the essence of the series with
only five coins. There are many ways
to represent the series’ five decades
and five mints, such as an 1878-CC,
1881-S, 1896(-P), 1903-O and 1921-D.
Whichever specific coins you
choose, a concentrated collection can
be a nice blend of breadth and depth.
Your collection is just that—your
collection—so its contents and development
should reflect your priorities
and your preferences. Whether you’re
pursuing a type collection or a
date/mintmark collection, or mixing
these methodologies, a definite collecting
approach will help you achieve
your collecting goals.