Author Topic: Mauritius: from British colony to independence  (Read 3022 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2016, 05:50:21 PM »
Queen Elizabeth II came to the throne in 1952. Her first coins for Mauritius were the 1 and 2 cents coins, issued in 1953. Eventually the whole set was issued in her name, with the same reverse designs as before. The last circulation coins for her reign are dated 1978.

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2016, 05:57:15 PM »
From Wikipedia:

At the Lancaster Conference of 1965, it became clear that Britain wanted to relieve itself of the colony of Mauritius. In 1959, Harold Macmillan had made his famous Winds of Change Speech where he acknowledged that the best option for Britain was to give complete independence to its colonies. Thus, since the late Fifties, the way was paved for independence.

Later in 1965, after the Lancaster Conference, the Chagos Archipelago was excised from the territory of Mauritius to form the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT). A general election took place on 7 August 1967, and the Labour Party and its two allies obtained the majority of seats. Mauritius adopted a new constitution and independence was proclaimed on 12 March 1968. Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam became the first prime minister of an independent Mauritius, with Queen Elizabeth II remaining head of state as Queen of Mauritius.


 
« Last Edit: January 01, 2018, 04:43:18 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #17 on: December 13, 2016, 05:59:27 PM »
The national flag of Mauritius, also known as the Four Bands and Les Quatre Bandes (French for "the four bands"), was adopted upon independence, March 12, 1968. It consists of four horizontal bands of equal width, coloured (from top to bottom) red, blue, yellow, and green. They stand for:

Red: representing the bloodshed at the time of slavery and colonisation.
Blue: the Indian Ocean, in the middle of which Mauritius is situated.
Yellow: the new light of independence shining over the island and the golden sunshine.
Green: the lush vegetation of the island.

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2016, 06:05:51 PM »








From Wikipedia:

In 1965, three years before the independence of Mauritius, the United Kingdom split the Chagos Archipelago from Mauritius and the islands of Aldabra, Farquhar and Desroches from the Seychelles to form the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT). The islands were formally established as an overseas territory of the United Kingdom on 8 November 1965. On 23 June 1976, Aldabra, Farquhar and Desroches were returned to Seychelles as a result of its attaining independence. The BIOT now comprises the Chagos Archipelago only. The UK leased the main island of the archipelago, Diego Garcia to the United States under a 50-year lease (which expires in 2016) to establish a military base.

Mauritius has repeatedly asserted that the separation of its territories is a violation of United Nations' resolutions banning the dismemberment of colonial territories before independence and claims that the Chagos Archipelago, including Diego Garcia, forms an integral part of the territory of Mauritius under both Mauritian law and international law. After initially denying that the islands were inhabited, British officials forcibly expelled to mainland Mauritius, approximately 2,000 Chagossians who had lived on those islands for a century. Since 1971, only the atoll of Diego Garcia is inhabited, home to some 3,000 UK and US military and civilian contracted personnel. Chagossians have since engaged in activism to return to the archipelago, claiming that the forced expulsion and dispossession were illegal.


See: Coins of British Indian Ocean Territory.

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2016, 08:12:36 PM »
In 1987 a new series of coins was issued. Instead of the portrait of the Queen, it featured the portrait of Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam, the first prime minister of Mauritius, who died in 1985. This was despite the fact that the Queen was still the head of state, since Mauritius did not become a republic until 1992. The new coinage consisted of copper-plated-steel 1 and 5 cents (the 5 cents was substantially reduced in size), nickel-plated-steel 20 cents and rupee, and copper-nickel 1 and 5 rupees. There were no 2 or 10 cents coins and no quarter rupee.

Apart from the obverse portrait, the only new design was on the reverse of the 5 rupees coin, which featured palm trees.

Below you can see examples of the 1 cent and 20 cents coins. Philip Nathan designed the portrait of Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam from a well known photograph.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2018, 10:26:30 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #20 on: December 13, 2016, 08:13:35 PM »


The reverse of the 5 rupees coin. The initials JS stand for John Savage, an English numismatic artist.

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #21 on: December 13, 2016, 08:20:53 PM »




In 1997 a circulation 10 rupees coin was released. The design was taken from a commemorative 10 rupees collector coin of 1981, seen above. It shows a man harvesting sugar cane and was designed by Robert Elderton.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 08:38:14 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #22 on: December 13, 2016, 08:31:50 PM »
In 2007 a bimetallic 20 rupee coins was issued to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Bank of Mauritius. Apparently this coin now circulates in Mauritius.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 05:55:26 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #23 on: December 13, 2016, 08:33:30 PM »
This ends my survey of the coinage of Mauritius.

Offline gerard974

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #24 on: December 14, 2016, 04:30:19 AM »
Hello
thank you very much for this topic
for Mauritius is no more commemoratives coins but the coins are very nice
best regards  Gerard

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2016, 10:18:57 AM »
Thank you, Gerard.   :)  I deliberately restricted myself to circulation coins, bu there were a lot of commemoratives in the 1970s. Below is my favourite.





Mauritius, 10 rupees, 1971.  Dodo.  Designer: Christopher Ironside



From Wikipedia:

The Dodo (Raphus cucullatus) is an extinct flightless bird that was endemic to the island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. Its closest genetic relative was the also extinct Rodrigues Solitaire, the two forming the subfamily Raphinae of the family of pigeons and doves.

The first recorded mention of the Dodo was by Dutch sailors in 1598. In the following years, the bird was preyed upon by hungry sailors, their domesticated animals, and invasive species introduced during that time. The last widely accepted sighting of a Dodo was in 1662. Its extinction was not immediately noticed, and some considered it to be a mythical creature. In the 19th century, research was conducted on a small quantity of remains of four specimens that had been brought to Europe in the early 17th century. Since then, a large amount of subfossil material has been collected from Mauritius, mostly from the Mare aux Songes swamp. The extinction of the Dodo within only about a century of its discovery called attention to the previously unrecognised problem of human involvement in the disappearance of entire species. The Dodo achieved widespread recognition from its role in the story of Alice in Wonderland, and it has since become a fixture in popular culture, often as a symbol of extinction and obsolescence. It is frequently used as a mascot on Mauritius.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 06:59:34 PM by <k> »

Offline gerard974

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #26 on: December 14, 2016, 03:35:54 PM »
hello
since the first coin in 1877 i have all the year and all the values except this one in silver ,in steel i have ,and the 1 and 10 rupees for year 2016 who are just minted
best regards  Gerard

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2016, 03:50:21 PM »
That's an excellent collection of Mauritius, Gerard. You obviously like that country a lot. Perhaps you will emigrate there?  ;)

Offline gerard974

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2016, 04:26:28 PM »
Hello again
emigrate ? no ,for me the Reunion (french department overseas) is very nice for all ,sun and french law. like i say to my wife when i go to the other side i want that my body stay on my island ;D
best regards  Gerard

Offline <k>

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Re: Mauritius: from British colony to independence
« Reply #29 on: December 18, 2016, 01:33:08 AM »