login

Author Topic: 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned  (Read 363 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10 111
  • Mumbai, India.
50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« on: December 06, 2016, 03:32:02 PM »
House of Representatives Approves Bill to Mint Coins for Moon Landing 50th

By Robert Z. Pearlman
December 6, 2016 07:00am ET

The United States Mint is now somewhere between a "small step" and a "giant leap" closer to striking coins for the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing.

The U.S. House of Representatives on Monday (Dec. 5) voted unanimously to pass the "Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coin Act," calling for the Mint to produce curved coins in gold, silver and clad to recognize the five decades since astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins launched on the first lunar landing mission.

The bill (H.R.2726) was passed under a suspension of the rules used to quickly approve non-controversial bills. The act was first introduced by Congressman Bill Posey (R-FL) in June 2015.

"Mr. Speaker, July 20, 2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the landing of the 'Eagle' lunar module on the moon's surface," Posey, who was a member of the Apollo team in 1969, said on the House floor on Monday. " We remain the only country that has ever launched humans [to] the moon and returned them safely to Earth.

"This commemorative coin will celebrate what I feel is the most awe-inspiring engineering and technological [feat] of the 20th century," said Posey.

Joining Posey as the initial cosponsors for the bill were representatives Frederica Wilson (D-FL), John Culberson (R-TX), Gene Green (D-TX) and Rod Blum (R-IA). The bill attracted the support of 293 more cosponsors before being passed on Monday.

Should the bill pass in the Senate before the end of the year and the President sign it into law, then the U.S. Mint will be directed to strike convex coins bearing the iconic image reflected in Buzz Aldrin's helmet visor, as was taken by Neil Armstrong on the moon.

"The design on the common reverse of the coins minted under this act shall be a representation of a close-up of the famous 'Buzz Aldrin on the moon' photo taken July 20, 1969, showing just the visor and [a] part of the helmet of astronaut [Aldrin], in which the visor reflects the image of the United States flag and the lunar lander," the legislation instructs.

That design would be further highlighted by the shape of the commemoratives.

"The coins minted under this act shall be produced in a fashion... so that the reverse of the coin is convex to more closely resemble the faceplate of the astronaut's helmet of the time," the bill directs.

The act calls for the coins to be issued in four legal tender denominations:

•   $5 gold coins - not more than 50,000 pieces, with a diameter of 0.85 inches (2.16 centimeters);

•   $1 silver coins - not more than 400,000 pieces, with a diameter of 1.5 in. (3.8 cm);

•   Half-dollar clad coins - not more than 750,000, with a diameter of 1.25 in. (3.2 cm);

•   Proof-silver $1 coins - not more than 100,000, with a diameter of 3 inches (7.6 cm).

Each of the coins, regardless of metal, will feature a front (obverse) design chosen by a juried competition overseen by the Secretary of the Treasury, after consulting with the Commission of Fine Arts and being viewed by the Citizen's Coinage Advisory Committee, which suggested the Apollo 11 theme in 2014.

Proceeds from the Mint's sale of the Apollo 11 coins would benefit the Astronaut Memorial Foundation and Astronaut Scholarship Foundation's science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs, as well as the Smithsonian's "Destination Moon" gallery opening at the National Air and Space Museum in 2020.

The coins' sale would also offset the cost of their minting, such that they are produced at no cost to taxpayers.

The Mint previously recognized the moon landing by using the Apollo 11 mission's official patch as the reverse design on the Eisenhower and Susan B. Anthony dollars issued from 1971 to 1981. The Mint also struck the New Frontier Congressional Gold Medal presented to Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins (and Mercury astronaut John Glenn) in 2011.

Source: Space

Image Caption: The iconic image of Buzz Aldrin's spacesuit helmet visor will serve as the design for the reverse of commemorative coins recognizing the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, if Congress approves.

Credit: NASA
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Online quaziright

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 162
Re: 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2016, 05:20:36 PM »
I wonder if they'll make these available at the Smithsonian aerospace museum. May go for the entire set as an exception though I tend to avoid gold

Offline onecenter

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 90
Re: 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2016, 08:48:13 PM »
The 76mm (3") coin is the same size as the 5-ounce America the Beautiful silver "quarter-dollars."  Definitely a must-have. :)
Mark

Offline Prosit

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 695
    • Austrian Coins, Tokens and Medals
Re: 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2016, 11:40:46 PM »
I have an (almost) complete set of the modern commemorative halfs. Always nice to get to add another to the series.
Dale

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10 111
  • Mumbai, India.
50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2016, 01:10:53 PM »
Since not a single coin is going to circulate (I guess clad half dollar is also NCLT), I'll pass this time too... :(

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Offline augsburger

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 671
Re: 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2016, 09:00:37 AM »
You'd think this would be worth doing properly with circulating coins. Perhaps a whole series of them, but....

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10 111
  • Mumbai, India.
50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2016, 10:22:43 AM »
You'd think this would be worth doing properly with circulating coins. Perhaps a whole series of them, but....

You know that there's a Russian conspiracy theory which says that US in fact never reached moon. >:D So if US issues a series of circulating coins commemorating moon landing, Russia might start a new series of coins rejecting the US claims. :D

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Offline eurocoin

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 650
Re: 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2016, 04:25:36 PM »
You'd think this would be worth doing properly with circulating coins. Perhaps a whole series of them, but....

Well, it is unbelievable how much effort a lot of people (including some of the astronauts that were on that flight) had to do to get coins issued for this occasion.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10 111
  • Mumbai, India.
50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2017, 08:05:06 AM »
Mint announces design competition for 2019 Apollo 11 Moon-landing commemorative

The Mint has issued a call for artists to participate in a design competition. Public Law 114-282 authorizes the secretary of the Treasury to mint and issue $5 gold, $1 silver, and 50-cent clad coins commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing. These coins will be struck in the domed format previously seen on the 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame commemorative coins.

The convex (domed) reverse will be designed by a U.S. Mint artist, and will feature “a representation of a close-up of the famous ‘Buzz Aldrin on the Moon’ photograph taken July 20, 1969, that shows just the visor and part of the helmet of astronaut Buzz Aldrin, including the reflection of astronaut Neil Armstrong, the United States flag, and the lunar lander.”

The concave (cupped) obverse, whose design is the subject of the competition, must be “emblematic of the United States space program leading up to the first manned Moon landing.”

The competition will take place in two phases. In phase 1, prospective artists will submit electronic portfolios of their original work. This phase does not involve actual coin design. Instead, the three to five works in each portfolio should demonstrate—

- the artist’s ability to convey complex concepts with symbolism,
- the masterful application of ingenuity in interpreting the subject matter and conveying its theme,
- the artist’s adaptability to different subject matters and themes, and
- the artist’s ability to render figures, portraits, animals, or landscapes with the use of perspective and scale.

From among the phase-1 applicants, a maximum of 20 artists will be selected to move on to phase 2, which will involve prospective designs for the Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coin Program’s common obverse. All artists selected for phase 2 will be paid $500 for their work. The final design selection will be made by a jury and approved by the secretary of the Treasury; the artist who creates the winning design will receive $5,000, and their design and initials will appear on the obverses of the coins.

Of course, there are numerous technical issues the artists will have to consider if they’re selected to participate in phase 2. In addition to the required inscriptions and other matters, the designs will be judged on the following criteria:

- overall quality and creativity in interpreting the subject matter for a coin,
- appropriate use of symbolism,
- clarity of idea and communication,
- appropriate level of detail for the scale and material of coins,
- good design sense, composition, and balance of space,
- effective incorporation of required text,
- the degree to which the design is emblematic of the U.S. space program leading up to the first manned Moon landing,
the degree to which the design complements the reverse design.

Although the competition rules don’t specify this, prospective artists would do well to study existing domed-coin designs and consider the kinds of subjects that are suited to the format. The rounded visor of the astronaut’s helmet, for example, is a perfect choice for the domed side of the coin. On the 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame coins mentioned previously, the domed side features a baseball, which of course is naturally rounded; the cupped side features the palm of a baseball glove. Canada’s 2017 coin honoring Roberta Bondar, the first female Canadian astronaut, depicts a view of Earth as seen from space on the domed side. Australia’s Southern Sky and Northern Sky series depict constellations on the cupped side, which mimics the apparent shape of space as seen from Earth. Many collector coins also make the most of the domed format. One coin from the Solomon Islands, for example, depicts the underside of a famous dome in Berlin, while another from Fiji replicates Captain America’s convex shield.

Phase 1 begins May 1, 2017, and the deadline for submissions is June 29. On July 31, the artists who have been selected to compete in phase 2 will be notified; their design submissions must be received by September 8. The winning design will be announced in 2018.

Source
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10 111
  • Mumbai, India.
50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2017, 08:05:45 AM »
The United States Mint has more information about the contest here.

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Offline augsburger

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 671
Re: 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing Collector Coins Planned
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2017, 01:05:02 PM »
https://www.usmint.gov/news/design-competitions/apollo-11/rules

To qualify for this competition artists must be:

a citizen of the United States or permanent resident
18 years of age or older