Kranichfeld Notgeld

Started by Pellinore, October 19, 2016, 11:46:15 PM

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Pellinore

When I was 15 and in hospital, an old man gave me a large album full of Notgeld. Since that moment, I always loved the typography and history of these German and Austrian 'banknotes' of the early and unhappy 'Twenties.

This small piece of Notgeld is from the town of Kranichfeld in Thuringia, dating from 1921. 'Kranich' is a bird, a Common Crane. The words are referring to the bad postwar times of Germany: "Proud our Crane is Standing Upright/ Head Up, when you are in a Time of Slight!"
Measure: 6 x 9 cm.
-- Paul


Figleaf

If I weren't collecting coins, I would consider German inflation banknotes. The town with the interesting name ;) uses a heraldic crane as the main element of its arms. The crane, a device from the arms of the counts of Kranichfeld, holds a cannon ball in one claw. The reason is not clear. The Dutch city of The Hague has a similarly burdened birdie in its arms, but it misses the arm from the cloud, a traditional symbol for god, offering a date palm leaf. This may refer to the legend that the date palm can grow even when it carries a heavy load (of fruits), nicely put as palma sub pondere crescit as the motto of Waldeck Pyrmont. The year 1650 is when Kranichfeld got city rights.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

So the slogan rhymes in German and in English. ;D As for that stone or cannonball, maybe it was supposed to add to the idea of being attentive "and if necessary, I will throw this at you" ... http://thueringen-universal.de/geschichte/wachsamer-vogel-mit-erhobener-kralle

Christian

Figleaf

Nice site. I encountered an article on the first computer in the GDR and how it compared with its West-German counterpart, the Zuse, for which a coin was issued.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

OT reply :) regarding those computers: Here is a Wikipedia article about that OPREMA beast. The Spiegel article (listed in the links) has more info and a photo. The Zuse coin commemorates his 100th birthday, not a specific computer ...

Christian