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Iceland - amusement arcade token

Started by FosseWay, October 14, 2016, 07:48:33 PM

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FosseWay

Took a guess that RKÍ (that acute accent gives it away) stood for something in Icelandic and, indeed, this appears to have been issued by the Icelandic Red Cross, Rauða Krossi Íslands.

Specifically, it is for use in a game I hadn't come across before and am not sure what it is called in English. In Icelandic it is tíkallakassi; in German Bajazzo. The machine in which the tokens were used is illustrated on Íslandsspil's website but with lorem ipsum text.

Wikipedia has this to say:

QuoteÁ Íslandi fékk Rauði krossinn leyfi fyrir þessum spilum árið 1972 sem var upphafið að spilakassarekstri samtakanna.

The Red Cross gained permission to use these games in Iceland in 1972, which was the beginning of the arcade industry there.

I seem to remember that gambling was very strictly controlled in Iceland, if not forbidden, for a while, and the Wikipedia entry seems to bear this out.

Given where I got this token from (Hasturin Antiikki), I suspect it was made by Sporrongs in Stockholm.

malj1

#1
Bajazzo is the German name for Clown but these machines, both Bajazzo and Clown, were the early mechanical game machines used c1900-1950.

Clown is used again with more modern machines by various makers see here (You need to search for clown or bajazzo it won't allow a direct link apparently) tíkallakassi is not listed.



Bajazzo is the German name for a stock character who is believed to have first appeared in the Italian Commedia dell'arte around the 1600s. In Italy he is called Burrattino, Bertoldo, Pagliaccio, Pedrolino, Peppe Nappa, Piero and Gian-Farina and in France he is Pierrot. He is a good natured but naive comic servant who is badly treated and must sleep with the animals in the straw. Pagliaio means straw, hence his Italian name. His German name probably comes from the French pailasse (straw bag) or the Italian baja (fun). In some German dialects Bajazzo is pronounced Bajass.

He often wears white face paint and a white costume with large buttons and a high pointed, funnel-shaped hat. The striking checkered tights are more characteristic of Harlequin (Arlecchino in Italian), also known as Truffaldino, Traccagnino, Bagattino, Tabarrino, Tortellino, Naccherino, Gradelino, Polpettino, Nespolino, Bertoldino, Fagiuolino, Trappolino, Zaccagnino, Trivellino, Passerino, Bagolino, Temellino, Fagottino, Fritellino and Tabacchino!
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

malj1

Found this

Quote: (Google translation)

Tika Box ( Finnish : pajatso or Jasso, from German Bajazzo; there from the Italian pagliaccio, "clown") are slot machines for gambling that were created in Finland on 3. decade 20. century . They evolved from a German slots going out to meet the ball into the hat clown characters parading to free money into the drawer bottom. Engines similar to American allwin-Japanese pachinko machines and boarding. The Finnish version consists of eight to ten parallel vertical runs that store money behind glass. Coin of the same type (Icelandic ten million coin was used in Iceland as an example) is placed in the slot on the side of the box and then it shot sideways by tapping a finger on the metal ring protruding from the side and tried to see into some the trough to free money in a drawer at the bottom. Miserfitt to meet superinfection troughs. Top Gran lists direct the coin in any direction and make it more likely to meet the slide one (and thus losing money) than into them. With a special knack is still possible to "defeat the system."
Tikal boxes were manufactured by the Finnish state enterprise Raha-automaattiyhdistys who had patented them in 1938. The first versions Tikal boxes were mechanical and electronic publications were launched in 1982. Tikal boxes were run by the Red Cross in the Nordic countries in fundraising since the fourth decade. Iceland's Red Cross permission for this play in 1972 as the starting point for arcade operations of the association.

This is an excerpt from the article Tika Box from the Wikipedia free encyclopedia. A list of Authors is available at Wikipedia.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

FosseWay

Thanks for the extra info on Bajazzo/Clown. One thing that springs to mind is that most of the US Allwin and German Bajazzo tokens I've come across are significantly smaller than the Icelandic one above (24.4 mm, 6.90 g), so presumably the machines for Iceland were specially modified/made, along with special tokens. Was this to stop the import and use of foreign tokens in order to restrict access to gambling as much as possible and/or protect the Red Cross's financial interest, I wonder?

malj1

Yes the Bajazzo and Clown tokens are 17.3mm approx., while the Allwin are 18.2mm approx. which BTW are German too and later copied by a couple of British makers after the outbreak of WW1

I think the larger Icelandic tokens may be for the later electronic versions.

I find that the Crompton tokens are 24.1mm and Phonograph Equipment had some at 24.3mm. No doubt other companies too used this size in the 1970-80s period.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

FosseWay

Quote from: malj1 on October 15, 2016, 11:06:10 AM
Yes the Bajazzo and Clown tokens are 17.3mm approx., while the Allwin are 18.2mm approx. which BTW are German too and later copied by a couple of British makers after the outbreak of WW1

I think the larger Icelandic tokens may be for the later electronic versions.

I find that the Crompton tokens are 24.1mm and Phonograph Equipment had some at 24.3mm. No doubt other companies too used this size in the 1970-80s period.

24.3 mm is also one of Sporrong's standard sizes, which adds weight to the possibility that they are the makers of this token.