Queen Elizabeth II Canadian coin

Started by ghipszky, July 04, 2009, 06:28:09 PM

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ghipszky

Here is another of the coins I found that have been in the drawer for who knows how long. It is a Canadian 5 cent piece with a beaver on the reverse. The Queen looks very young.
Ginger
Could this coin be made out of nickel too?

translateltd

Very likely - a magnet will confirm.  The composition of Canadian "nickels" has changed frequently.  I'm away from my catalogues right now but found the following on someone's eBay listing, which sounds correct:

>Several times the composition of this coin was changed. From 1922 to 1942 they were made of pure nickel. In 1942 and 1943 an alloy known as tombac (88% copper, 12% zinc) was used. In 1944 and 1945 steel was used. In 1946 the use of pure nickel was resumed until 1951. In 1951 the commemorative 5 cent coin was made of nickel while the beaver design was made of steel. Steel was used until 1954 until nickel was again resumed in 1955. In 1982 the composition was changed to match the US nickel, 75% copper and 25% nickel. And finally in 1999 a new composition of steel plated with copper-nickel was created.

The shape has changed from round to 12-sided and back again, too.


bart

The portrait of queen Elizabeth II has been designed by Arnold Machin. It was introduced in 1968 and was in use on Canadian coinage until it was replaced in 1989 by the effigy by Dora de P├ędery-Hunt.

bart

BC Numismatics

Bart,
  The Dora de Pedery-Hunt obverse design was actually introduced in 1990,not 1989.This was replaced during 2003 by the current obverse design by Susanna Blunt.

As for Canadian 5c. coins,the 'P' plating mark stopped being used in 2006,& replaced by a mintmark.

Aidan.

Figleaf

The beaver has been on the coin longer than the queen >:D

The tiny letters KG refer to designer George Kruger Gray. He designed the reverse of the one cent and five cent that has been in continual use on circulation coins since 1937. He also designed the reverse of the 50 cent coin in use from 1937 to 1958.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

#5
Quote from: Figleaf on July 05, 2009, 01:04:36 PM
The beaver has been on the coin longer than the queen >:D

The tiny letters KG refer to designer George Kruger Gray. He designed the reverse of the one cent and five cent that has been in continual use on circulation coins since 1937. He also designed the reverse of the 50 cent coin in use from 1937 to 1958.

Peter

Peter,
  The current Canadian 1c. reverse design has also been around since 1937 as well.Yes,that was also designed by George Kruger-Gray.

The 10c. & 25c. reverse design has also been around since 1937 as well,but they were designed by this guy; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmanuel_Hahn .

Aidan.

tonyclayton

I attach the images of the two tombac Canadian 5c pieces of 1942 and 1943.  The 1943 design continued until the end of the war, and in 1951 a nickel commemorative was also issued.  The other year when the design was different was 1967, when a hopping rabbit appeared!

Around the edge of the 1943 design the beading is in Morse Code, and as I recall it says 'We Win When We Work Willingly'

tonyclayton

Here is the other coin - my software only allows me to add one image at a time (clicking on 'more attachments' doesn't work).

BC Numismatics

Tony,
  The 1944 'Victory' 5c. coin was actually struck in steel,as nickel was in pretty short supply,due to the huge demand created by the war effort.

Yes,I have got both 1942 5c. coins,plus the 1943 5c. coin in my collection.

Aidan.

Figleaf

Great coin, Tony, tail of the beaver and the maple leaves are fully detailed and it looks like it has at least some original metal colour left, while tombac discolours so easily. A real beauty. I suspect you have more such lying around ...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.