Author Topic: Quiz of remembrance  (Read 932 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Quiz of remembrance
« on: April 01, 2014, 12:14:42 AM »
It's almost a year ago since the theft, but I am still trying to get up and start walking. Blame me, not my friends. A number of great friends and relatives have donated small euro change. I have now organised what I have in that area. In that process, I have discovered quite a few duplicates. I kept the ones I had already put in coin cartons and the somewhat less common coins and gave up the others for spending. There are a good number of coins left, all from circulation, no rarities, no BU, some UNCs.

In order to give the accidental duplicates a good home, here are some quiz questions. All questions refer to coins with denominations not higher than 2 euros, including 2 euro commemorative coins, except pieces from San Marino, Vatican and Monaco. Most if not all answers can be found in Wikipedia, the EU site and this site. Yes, the idea is to let you do some research :) Whoever gives me the correct answers first gets first right of refusal. At refusal, the coins go to the next participant. If none have all answers correct, the member with the least mistakes gets right of refusal etc. I pay postage. The quiz ends on 1st May 2014, the day I obtain the right to receive a pension ;)

Here are the questions. Please respond to me in a PM NOT ON THE WOC SITE!

0. are you playing for fun or for the coins? (no wrong answers)
1. which two (parts of) animals can be found on the edge of euro coins?
2. which country has issued the coin with the most stars on it?
3. what is the commercial name of the metal used for the 10, 20 and 50 cent?
4. why did Greece need to outsource part of the coin production dated 2002, but not in subsequent years?
5. which country put its flag on at least two euro coins?
6. which euro country issued a pseudo coin with a denomination of 2 euros or less?
7. which country put the word "god" on a euro coin?
8. what is the official plural of euro and cent?
9. the EU mandated changes on the common side in 2006. Why?
10. a number of countries made slight changes in the design of the national side after 2008. Why?

Have fun,

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2014, 12:01:05 PM »
Two sets of answers already, both imperfect. Please mind that the questions 9 and 10 are why. It's not what they did, but why they did it. Here is a link with excellent pictures of euro coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2014, 04:57:58 PM »
I shall give a try this weekend. :)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2014, 06:29:55 PM »
Baaad timing ;)  Not only am I far away from Europe right now, my "better" computer and my reference material are not with me either. Well, if I waited until I get back, my chances to win would be close to zero, so I'll try my second best ...

But thank you for the contest, Peter! Appreciate the idea that, even under the circumstances mentioned in the subject, you give some coins away.

Christian

Offline THCoins

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2014, 07:39:50 PM »
Nice idea for a quiz !
But i have to pass, these types are 1000 years above my upper limit of knowledge  :)

Offline chrisild

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2014, 10:14:12 AM »
The quiz ends on 1st May 2014, the day I obtain the right to receive a pension ;)

While your pension may not come in today due to the holiday ... when exactly did you say the quiz ends? ;D

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2014, 10:56:45 AM »
Here are the answers:

1. which two (parts of) animals can be found on the edge of euro coins?
2. which country has issued the coin with the most stars on it?
3. what is the commercial name of the metal used for the 10, 20 and 50 cent?
4. why did Greece need to outsource part of the coin production dated 2002, but not in subsequent years?
5. which country put its flag on at least two euro coins?
6. which euro country issued a pseudo coin with a denomination of 2 euros or less?
7. which country put the word "god" on a euro coin?
8. what is the official plural of euro and cent?
9. the EU mandated changes on the common side in 2006. Why?
10. a number of countries made slight changes in the design of the national side after 2008. Why?

1. On Finnish 2 euro coins, you will find barely recognisable lion heads and on German coins, there are eagles on the 2 euro coins you will recognise only when you know what they are. Source.
2. This was the make-or-break question. My own candidate was the Austrian 2 euro coin, which has 12 stars on the edge plus 12 on the common side. It turned out to be an also-ran. The winner is the 5 cent Slovenia, which has 25 stars (the number of member states at the time) on the national side plus 12 on the common side for a total of 37 stars! Christian's solution:
Quote
With microscope eyes or hi-res images you can see that the 2012 common issue has 24 stars on the national sides: Twelve on the ring as usual, plus twelve tiny stars around that euro logo next to the ECB  building (been there, seen that). If you now add the twelve on the common side, and the twelve on some issues (Belgium, France, etc.) ... you end up with a whopping forty-eight.
Since few of us have microscope eyes, I thought the 37 answer would be good enough. Source
3. Nordic gold. Source
4. Greece was the last country to enter the euro zone upon its creation, as there was confusion over whether or not it had met the criteria. Based on somewhat doubtful figures, Greece was admitted in the nick of time, but too late to mint all its coins itself. More details
5. Austria (all eight denominations), and France (the three mid-range denominations). The colours are indicated by heraldically correct shading. The flags are quite clear on the Austrian coins. On the French coins, they cover the whole background of the design, making them less clear. Source
6.Austria, France and Portugal. The Portuguese pieces were available at face, the others were not, so they do not count for the purposes of the quiz.
7. The Netherlands (GOD, edge). If the word for god in other languages counts too: Latvia (DIEVS, edge - coin not yet issued). Like the flag, this is a doubtful, but tolerated practice. Source
8. Look at the coins. The denominations show that the plural is unchanged, according to German and Dutch grammar. In practice, cents and euros, even centimes and lepta are all tolerated.
9. The EU had expanded in 2004 and it was clear that more countries would be coming in (the next wave was admitted in 2007). The old map was no longer a reflection (sort of) of the membership. The solution was an all-inclusive map that shows non-members also. Source. This change solved the "problem" that Sweden looked like a penis.
10. On 19th December 2008, the Commission issued a recommendation that stated:
Quote
- The national sides of all denominations of the euro circulation coins should bear an indication of the issuing Member State by means of the Member State’s name or an abbreviation of it.
- The national side should not repeat any indication on the denomination, or any parts thereof, of the coin neither should it repeat the name of the single currency or of its subdivision, unless such indication stems from the use of a different alphabet.
Finland (country name) and Belgium (country name) changed their coins to comply with the recommendation. Austria (denomination) and Germany (country name) refuse to implement it. Greece says it is pondering a change (country name). Source

As you can see, the answers could be obtained largely with information available on the internet. So it is with many coins and tokens. The information on the net is staggering. The new bottleneck is not availability, but quality of information.

Participants for fun were Bimat, chrisild, Eurocoin and Izotz. Their performance was very impressive.
The only participant for coins, therefore the winner of the lot is (drum roll) DHEER. Now, I have to figure out how to send his prize safely to him. ;)

Congratulations to all participants, all of them winners.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2014, 12:17:18 PM »
Congratulations, dheer! And thank you for the contest, Peter!

As for Q2, that was funny - I knew about the 36 but was not aware of the 37th star, so out of sheer despair ;D I mentioned the extra 12 which are hardly visible indeed. See the attached mini-image and this photo of the old/current ECB HQ.

Now Q10 (or rather A10), weeeelll ... as you say, this was a Commission recommendation, with lots of "should" in the text. We also know that member states "should" arrange the stars in the ring as they appear on the flag - again, quite a few member states have not done that yet, but usually did so with regard to newly designed coins. Now the actual law (Council Regulation 566/2012) came a little later, and with generous transition phases. Taking into account that coins last roughly 50 years (give a couple, take a couple), member states have - see Art. 1g - another 48 years to "fully comply", hehe.

Now the contest was fun. The occasion could have been a more joyful one, but I appreciate this. :)

Christian


Offline Bimat

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2014, 02:28:00 PM »
Congrats Dheer! :)

I'm sure I wouldn't have got the answer for #2 correct. My answer was 24, but 37 is just too far from that. ;D Hard to imagine microscopic eyes some collectors have. Would have never thought of that.

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline dheer

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2014, 05:30:25 AM »
Thanks everyone.

@Bimat on #2 my initial answer was 24 ... then Peter mentioned its incorrect and I went upto 36 I think ... and Peter mentioned there is someone [now I know who :) ] who's got more than anyone can figure out :)

http://coinsofrepublicindia.blogspot.in
A guide on Republic India Coins & Currencies

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2014, 11:53:33 AM »
If it's any comfort, I got it wrong also, but am amused with the eventual results. Also, I am highly amused with the 50-year transition period in REG566-2012. A recommendation is not binding, but it is a sign that the Commission is ready to propose a directive or regulation if the recommendation is not implemented. That's what happened in 2012. The 50-year implementation period is the kind of compromise that indicates that the Commission acted in the knowledge that the importance of this piece of legislation is not high - it's basically over who owes what side of the coin. The two member states must have known they didn't need a 50-year transition period, so they acted a bit childish over this non-issue. Let's forgive them. They are far from being among the usual troublemakers.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Quiz of remembrance
« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2014, 12:27:04 PM »
Right, this is not about making trouble but rather about ... inertia maybe? ;)  The Dutch coins, for example, had the twelve stars in the wrong places - and that was not changed until Willem-Alexander became king. Luxembourg still has not modified its pieces. Now the republics among the euro countries do not put their heads of state on the coins anyway, which supports this "oh well, why make any changes" attitude.

Then again, when it comes to Austria and Germany, the changes could be done quite easily. For Austria, replace the repeated denomination and the flag with "Republik Österreich". On German coins, add a small "DE" somewhere. Nah, wait, the government loves to confuse collectors, so it would probably be a "D" again. ;D  Both modifications should not really take 48 years ...

Christian