Author Topic: Lowest denominations  (Read 6509 times)

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Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2016, 12:22:48 AM »
I've been looking at some of these Mal, but not seen one at the right grade and the right price just yet. My problem is I'm terribly impatient: if I see something I like I have to have it immediately. This means I regret some purchases as I could have bought better.  ::)

I do hope to be posting a picture of a beautiful 1862 1 centime once it has been delivered, purchased this evening. However, I'm pretty sure it's one I won't regret. :)

Offline gerard974

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #16 on: April 05, 2016, 04:40:50 AM »
hello
some years ago from Madagascar circulating francs and ariary
the more little coin was 1 franc and the more big note is 10 000 ariary,1 ariary is equivaleant to 5 francs,10 000 ariary egal 50 000 1 franc coin.
When i go to madagascar i think will be millionaire because 10 000 ariary equivalent around 3 euros
best regards  Gerard

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2016, 07:46:09 PM »
Thanks Gerard. Did you see a 50 centimes? My research suggests they had one! :)

Offline gerard974

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #18 on: April 08, 2016, 04:37:56 AM »
Hello
yes 50 centimes circulating but in 1943 when Madagascar was a French colony
Best regards  Gerard

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #19 on: April 08, 2016, 02:01:43 PM »
Talking of centimes, this finally arrived today. :)

« Last Edit: April 10, 2016, 10:55:42 PM by mrbadexample »

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2016, 11:13:41 PM »
My next offering is a triplet of Finnish penniä:

« Last Edit: April 14, 2016, 05:43:48 PM by mrbadexample »

Online Figleaf

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2016, 12:24:16 AM »
The first is a coin of an arch-conservative empire, doomed and unable to change even if it had wanted to. The second is a coin of a revolution. The third is a coin of a new country, torn by meaningless fights between extreme rightists and weak and clumsy centrists (there is a lesson there somewhere, if only we would find it.)

More information here.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 14, 2016, 08:24:45 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2016, 01:12:42 AM »
Yes Peter, I noted that the 1917 is listed as Civil War coinage. These appealed to me in particular because of the three different designs covering a relatively short period of time (although 1916, 1917 & 1919 would have been even better  ;D).

Thanks as always for pointing me at the extra information.  :)

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2016, 05:37:01 PM »
Today's offering is 1 Swiss rappen, 1932. :)

Online Figleaf

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2016, 08:27:04 PM »
The fun feature here is how, in a country of four languages, the coin is in a fifth language.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2016, 08:51:42 PM »
Yes Peter, I noted that the 1917 is listed as Civil War coinage. These appealed to me in particular because of the three different designs covering a relatively short period of time (although 1916, 1917 & 1919 would have been even better  ;D).

Thanks as always for pointing me at the extra information.  :)

Notice on the Provisional Government coinage that the Russian arms are retained but the crown has been removed.

I'm slightly confused by the term "liberated" issue with reference to KM 21. For a start, Finland wasn't under an occupation from which it could be liberated; it declared independence from Russia before the Civil War and the Russians, whether tsarists, Mensheviks or Bolsheviks, were in no position to do anything other than recognise it (which Lenin explicitly did). In the prejudiced language of the Civil War victors, Helsinki was indeed "liberated" by the right-wing White faction (with help from the Germans) from control by the Red (Communist) faction, but it was a case of Finns fighting Finns, not occupation by a foreign power.

Secondly, although I can't find a definitive answer to this question, the style and the legend on this solitary 5 penniä coin suggests to me that it is the product of the Red government, not the White or postwar governments. The text "Kansan työ, kansan valta" means "work for the people, power for the people" which is hardly a suitable slogan for the bourgeois Whites. Also the fact that it is solitary is telling: the provisional government of Kerenski managed to issue the full range of denominations, but this 5 penniä is on its own. The Finnish Civil War was mercifully short (compared to similar conflicts in Russia and later in Spain) and control by the Reds of anything approximating to state apparatus was very short-lived.

If you're interested in the background to the Finnish Civil War, I can recommend Kjell Westö's novel Där vi en gång gått, which I think is available in English as well, probably called "Where we once walked" or similar. It covers the story of families from both sides of the divide. It has also been made into a film.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #26 on: April 15, 2016, 09:53:40 AM »
The fun feature here is how, in a country of four languages, the coin is in a fifth language.

Peter

I suppose it begs the question, which of the four would you use otherwise? :)

Online Figleaf

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #27 on: April 15, 2016, 11:20:56 AM »
All fours, as in Belgium. Languages do play a role in Swiss politics, but they are by far not as divisive as in Belgium. The play on the common heritage by using latin is not only clever, but also constructive.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2016, 06:55:50 PM »
All fours, as in Belgium. Languages do play a role in Swiss politics, but they are by far not as divisive as in Belgium. The play on the common heritage by using latin is not only clever, but also constructive.

Peter

Four in Belgium? I've seen that they have legends in French and Flemish on the centimes. What have I missed?  :-\

Online Figleaf

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Re: Lowest denominations
« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2016, 09:17:05 PM »
No, four in Switzerland, three in Belgium, but German is on only a few coins as German speakers count as Walloon most of the time. Belgium is a complicated place.

Its smallest denomination was one centiemen or centime. It's not particularly small and (at the time) almost the same value as a French centime. The "almost" explains why some 2 centiemen coin are overstruck on a Dutch cent. It was a profitable business. Belgian copper was exported to the Netherlands for a 5.5% gain. The "almost" also explains why Dutch big silver coins struck in Brussels are so hard to find: they were re-melted and exported to France. So much for the idea that coins were used in one country.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.