Author Topic: The modern coinage of Macao  (Read 5209 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2016, 10:07:56 PM »


The 50 avos of 1993 featured a traditional dragon dance.

The new coin was aluminium-brass, weighed 4.59 g and measured 23 mm in diameter.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #31 on: March 16, 2016, 10:12:01 PM »


Macao, 1 pataca, 1992.  The Guia Lighthouse.

The new coin was copper-nickel, weighed 8.9 g and measured 25.98 mm in diameter.  It was introduced in 1992, a year earlier than the lower denominations.

 
« Last Edit: March 25, 2019, 12:32:57 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #32 on: March 16, 2016, 10:16:17 PM »


Macao, 5 patacas, 1992.

The single wall remaining of St. Paul's cathedral after the fire of 1835, a symbol of the city-state. The water and junk are a separate design element, as the cathedral was not on the water.

The new coin was copper-nickel, weighed 10.1 g and measured 27.5 mm in diameter. In shape it was dodecagonal (12-sided).  It was introduced in 1992, a year earlier than the lower denominations.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #33 on: March 16, 2016, 10:22:50 PM »
The Ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral.
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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2016, 10:30:22 PM »
The reverses of the 1993 set.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2017, 01:31:25 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2016, 10:34:54 PM »


In 1997 Macao issued a bimetallic 10 patacas coin.  It featured St Dominic's Church, Macao.



From numista.com:

Metal   Bi-Metallic Copper-nickel center in Brass ring
Weight   12 g
Diameter   28 mm
Thickness   2.7 mm
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2016, 10:35:26 PM »
St Dominic's Church, Macao.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2016, 10:43:19 PM »


Macao issued its first 2 patacas coin in 1998. 

The coin was octagonal and made of nickel-brass. Weight: 9.5 g; diameter: 27.5 mm.

The reverse design featured Penha Church and Ama Temple.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #38 on: March 16, 2016, 10:47:35 PM »
A Ma Temple and Penha Church, Macao.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #39 on: March 17, 2016, 05:49:01 PM »
From Wikipedia:

The Chinese government assumed formal sovereignty over Macau on 20 December 1999. The economy since then has continued to prosper with the sustained growth of tourism from mainland China and the construction of new casinos.

The Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration and Macau Basic Law, Macau's constitution, promulgated by China's National People's Congress in 1993, specified that Macau's social and economic system, lifestyle, rights, and freedoms would remain unchanged for at least 50 years after the transfer of sovereignty to China in 1999. Under the principle of "one country, two systems", Macau enjoys a high degree of autonomy in all areas except defence and foreign affairs. Macau officials, rather than PRC officials, run Macau through the exercise of separate executive, legislative, and judicial powers, as well as the right to final adjudication. Macau maintains its own currency (the Macanese pataca), customs territory, immigration and border controls and police force.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #40 on: March 17, 2016, 05:55:39 PM »
A new design series was issued in 1999, to celebrate Macao's return to China from Portugal.

10 avos.       Sun Yat Sen memorial park.
20 avos.       Convent of the Precious Blood, location of Macao’s Monetary Authority.
50 avos.       The Bridge of Friendship, between Macao and Taipa.
1   pataca.    Cultural Centre.
2   patacas.  Formula 3 racing car in front of the ruins of St Paul’s Church.
5   patacas.  Greyhound racing, with the Lisbon Hotel in the background.
10 patacas.  Government Palace.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #41 on: March 17, 2016, 06:01:17 PM »
The common obverse of the new set showed the municipal flag of Macao.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2017, 01:32:44 AM by <k> »
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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #42 on: March 17, 2016, 06:04:27 PM »
From: CRW Flags

Macao City municipal flag

The flag commonly used in the territory was the local flag of the capital: Cidade de Santo Nome de Deus de Macau. This flag is blue with the municipal shield in the center.

Jaume Ollé 07 April 1997

Strictly speaking this was the flag of the /Leal Senado/ (Loyal Senate), the municipal council of the City of Macau (that is, the peninsula portion of Macau) from 1583 to 1999.

The flag displayed a version of the coat-of-arms of the Kingdom of Portugal: it commemorated the Senate as the only place in the world to continue to fly the Portuguese flag, when the Portuguese Empire was under Spanish control (Iberian Union) from 1580 to 1640. For this feat of loyalty, the City of Macau was granted the title "Cidade do Santo Nome de Deus de Macau, Năo Há Outra Mais Leal" (City of the Holy Name of God of Macau, There is None More Loyal) by King John IV in 1654; a slightly shortened version of this title appeared at the bottom of the flag. The Senate itself was likewise granted the title "Loyal" by Prince-Regent John (later King John VI) in 1810.

Although the flag was technically only that of the /Leal Senado/ of the City of Macau, it was sometimes used as the flag to represent the whole colony of Macau, notably during international sporting events (such as the Asian Games). Nonetheless during Macau's handover ceremony to China in 1999, the announcers made it clear that it was the flag of the /Leal Senado de Macau/ that was to be lowered along with that of Portugal.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #43 on: March 17, 2016, 06:10:08 PM »
Portugal also issued a silver 500 escudos coin to commemorate the handover. It featured the famous Taipa bridge.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #44 on: March 17, 2016, 06:17:57 PM »
China also issued various coins in 1999 to commemorate the event.

Below: China, 10 yuan, 1999.
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