Author Topic: The modern coinage of Macao  (Read 5218 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2016, 08:06:50 PM »
In 1974 Macao issued its first commemorative coin, a silver 20 patacas coin, 35mm in diameter and weighing 18 grams. It commemorated the opening of the Macao-Taipa Bridge. The reverse design shows a Chinese junk sailing under the bridge.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2016, 08:08:57 PM »
From Wikipedia:

The Governor Nobre de Carvalho Bridge also known as the Macau-Taipa Bridge, is a dual-lane two-way bridge connecting Macau Peninsula near Casino Lisboa and the island of Taipa at the northern slope of Taipa Pequena (Small Taipa Hill) crossing the Baía da Praia Grande. It is the first bridge in Macau, to connect the peninsula and Taipa. It is locally known as "The Old Bridge" (Chinese: 舊大橋).

Construction started in June 1970, during Portuguese rule. With a length of 2,569.8 metres (8,431 ft) and a width of 9.2 metres (30 ft), it was opened to traffic in October 1974. The middle of the bridge is raised, in the shape of a triangular arc, to allow vessels to pass through. The highest point of the bridge is 35 metres (115 ft) above sea level. Once the longest continuous bridge on Earth, it is named after José Manuel de Sousa e Faria Nobre de Carvalho, the Governor of Macau from November 25, 1966, to November 19, 1974. Due to the construction around Casino Lisboa, the bridge was temporarily closed in 2005. As of 2006, the bridge is open again, but only to buses and taxis.

The bridge is meant to take the shape of a dragon, with Casino Lisboa representing the dragon's head, and Taipa Monument on Taipa Pequena the dragon's tail.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2016, 08:50:42 PM »
Meanwhile, history was on the march in the colonial power of Portugal. From 1933 until 1968, Portugal had been governed by António de Oliveira Salazar, a right-wing authoritarian dictator. He was against socialism, communism and liberalism and was an old-fashioned traditionalist, in favour of Catholicism. Though his regime adopted something of a fascist look in the 1930s (using fascist salutes and fascistic uniforms), he was in fact against fascism. He despised Hitler, neo-paganism, the cult of youth, and the idea that "might is right". He also strongly disapproved of racism and anti-semitism.

Salazar was, however, a convinced imperialist. He believed that Portugal had a "civilising mission" around the world, and especially in its colonies in Africa, which he regarded as an integral part of Portugal. After the Second World War, unlike the other Western powers, he clung to his empire and refused to offer independence to his colonies. Eventually this caused wars of resistance in Angola, Mozambique and Portuguese Guinea, which put increasing strain on the Portuguese economy and military. It also alienated Portugal from her Western neighbours, who saw Salazar as an outdated and increasingly brutal dictator. After suffering a stroke in 1968, Salazar was replaced by Marcelo Caetano, who followed similar policies. Eventually, in 1974, the Portuguese military rebelled and overthrew the regime in a remarkably peaceful coup, known as the Carnation Revolution. After two turbulent years, Portugal established a democratic government on April 25 1976.

From Wikipedia:

Shortly after Portugal's 1974 Carnation Revolution, which overthrew the Estado Novo dictatorship, the new government determined it would relinquish all its overseas possessions. In 1976, Lisbon redefined Macau as a "Chinese territory under Portuguese administration" and granted it a large measure of administrative, financial, and economic autonomy. Three years later, Portugal and China agreed to regard Macau as "a Chinese territory under (temporary) Portuguese administration".
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2016, 08:57:07 PM »
In 1978, Macao issued a new 50 avos coin, for that year only. Its design more closely matched the format of the 5 and 10 avos coins that had been first issued in 1952. The denomination was moved to the other side of the coin, and the Portuguese arms were replaced by Chinese characters showing the denomination.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2016, 09:11:03 PM »
In 1982 Macao issued a new design series. The lowest denomination was now 10 avos. The last 5 avos coin had been issued in 1967. There was now a 20 avos coin for the first time, but the highest denomination was still 5 patacas. The legends of "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" and "MACAU" were now brought together on the obverse, which showed a less elaborate version of the Portuguese arms.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2016, 09:12:15 PM »
The common obverse design of the new 1982 set.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #21 on: March 16, 2016, 09:14:06 PM »
The new 10 avos coin was brass, weighed 3.3 g and measured 19.1 mm in diameter. The reverse gave the denomination in Portuguese and in Chinese characters.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #22 on: March 16, 2016, 09:17:02 PM »
The new 20 avos coin was brass, weighed 4.7 g and measured 21.1 mm in diameter. The reverse gave the denomination in Portuguese and in Chinese characters.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #23 on: March 16, 2016, 09:25:10 PM »
The new 50 avos coin was brass, weighed 5.75 g and measured 23 mm in diameter. The reverse gave the denomination in Portuguese and in Chinese characters.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #24 on: March 16, 2016, 09:29:59 PM »
The new 1 pataca coin was copper-nickel, weighed 9.2 g and measured 26 mm in diameter. The reverse showed two carps associated with the goddess Mazu and symbolising harmony.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #25 on: March 16, 2016, 09:34:58 PM »


The new 5 patacas coin was copper-nickel, weighed 10.7 g and measured 27.5 mm in diameter.

The reverse showed a dragon as a symbol of good luck.

 
« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 02:20:51 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #26 on: March 16, 2016, 09:37:23 PM »
From Wikipedia:

The Chinese and Portuguese governments commenced negotiations on the question of Macau in June 1986. The two signed a Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration the next year, making Macau a special administrative region (SAR) of China.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #27 on: March 16, 2016, 09:50:03 PM »
In 1993 Macao released another new design series. The new obverse included a stylised bat as a symbol of good luck.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #28 on: March 16, 2016, 09:56:48 PM »
The 10 avos of 1993 features a traditional lion dance.

The new coin was brass, weighed 1.38 g and measured 17 mm in diameter.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: The modern coinage of Macao
« Reply #29 on: March 16, 2016, 10:01:47 PM »


Macao, 20 avos, 1993.  Dragon boat.

The new coin was brass, weighed 2.8 g and measured 20 mm in diameter. Unlike the previous coin, it was 12-sided (dodecagonal).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.