Author Topic: Coin production techniques and machines  (Read 17100 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #30 on: February 08, 2014, 08:47:03 AM »
Thank you Filat and welcome to World of Coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Filat

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #31 on: February 08, 2014, 02:02:48 PM »
Supplement № 2:

http://publications.aww.pt/capeverde/arqcvpub/wrecks_mai010_plates_gallery.aspx#

P.S.
I collect pictures:
- Antique engravings;
- Photos;
- Postcards
and video
with a demonstration of vehicles, machinery, tools, technological methods coinage 15 - 20 centuries.
YV

Offline Filat

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2014, 02:18:36 PM »
Supplement № 3 - Ingermanland in the mirror of numismatic finds
http://www.roerich-izvara.ru/eng/exhibition-ingermanland.htm
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Offline Filat

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2014, 02:58:20 PM »
Supplement № 4.
P.S.
Exceptionally small size of images in this forum. Very sorry
YV

Offline Filat

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #34 on: February 12, 2014, 06:29:01 AM »
I guess every coin colector knows this picture. It was used to instruct emperor Maximilian about the coinage process. The point of showing it here is that our lonely Greek minter had become surrounded by people of other trades as well as a control infrastructure.

At ten o'clock in the picture is the furnace, where metal was molten. In practice, it was not in the mint, as the heat would have made a confined place unsuitable for working. The unspeakables working with the oven are not shown. They were poor and pretty naked and therefore of no interest to an emperor. The molten metal was rolled to plates. One of these is being worked in the centre. A trained craftsman is hammering flans out of the plates. The rest of the plate will be re-molten.

The planchets will go to the man at 8 o'clock. He will check them on weight and roundness with his scissors-like instrument, actually a measuring tool. The approved planchets will go to the minter at 4 o'clock. Apart from his clothes, he's not very different from his Greek counterpart above. However, note the child, putting flans on the lower die. The boy has a dangerous job. Move too quickly and the flan will not be well positioned on the die. Since the minter is paid by the piece, that will not make him happy - and the boy is paid by the minter. Move too slowly and fingers may be lost to the dies and hammer. Consider that 10 to 12 working hours a day were found normal, also for children.

The coins struck would end up in the bucket at 5 o'clock, but a few would be set apart for random checking by putting them into the locked box at 6 o'clock. Usually, the box could be opened only by a set of keys. The mint master would have one of them, the representative of the ruler (proof master) another. Sometimes the assayer would have a third. In cases of fraud or corruption, the mint master was able to buy off the proof master or tamper with the mint box. An often occurring form of corruption would be that the mint master would have a large number of coins weighed together for approval, then separate out the relatively heavy coins for his friends, who would clip and sweat them and return them for re-melting.

Finally, the coins would be sold by the mint master at 12 o'clock, probably to a merchant. The mint master was likely to be a private person who had bought the right to mint for a certain period.Mint organizations differed, but some other mint staff not shown in the picture are likely to be an overseer of the ruler, choosing the coins to be put into the locked case for random checking, an assayer, and an engraver.

In the next installments, we will see how the problems of fraud and corruption were solved and the functions shown and not shown on the picture were mechanized.
Peter
I am looking for photos of the original document specified on a picture.
YV

Offline Filat

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #35 on: February 24, 2014, 06:44:49 AM »
One of the best demonstrations of the sequence of operations of manufacturing coins in the early twentieth century (see link).
http://todayinsci.com/Books/HowItIsMade/01-MoneyMaking.htm
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Offline Filat

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #36 on: May 09, 2014, 08:52:50 AM »
Supplement № 5: 10 daler - the biggest coin in the world.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 10:13:24 AM by Filat »
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