Author Topic: Coin production techniques and machines  (Read 17161 times)

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Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2010, 02:10:35 AM »
Two more devices need to be mentioned. The hand driven edge mill was also given more power and in the end incorporated in the press. However, a specific technique for edge inscriptions was the "virole brisée". The best way to think of it is three coin edge dies, pushed into the coin's edge, together forming a complete circle.

The other machine is the reducing lathe. This device can work from a large model and produces a copy in a smaller size and different material. Therefore, it can turn one gypsum model of say the head of king with lettering into dies for a whole series of coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2010, 02:28:58 AM »
A final note on the story. It is quite euro-centric. I thought about incorporating Indian hammering and Chinese casting techniques, but feared I didn't know enough about it. I just touched on main developments, going into detail only in the juicy case of Marx Schwab. There is much, much more to say about minting, but I wasn't out to write a magazine article.

The thread gives the impression that almost all inventions were made after say 1780. However, you can easily see from the coins shown on this site that the difference in artistry and execution between early medieval coins and late renaissance coins is enormous. The developments just weren't in machinery.

Please add to this thread as you see fit. I have followed a loose chronological order, but any order will do just fine. Thanks to AJG who contributed already.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Austrokiwi

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2010, 11:58:43 AM »
A small adddition. In conductng my research I found the Royal Mint(UK)  used a canneluring machine to produce the edge markings on Maria Theresa thalers.  Up to the point of finding this out I had always associated canneluring machines with rifle ammunition.

Offline Salvete

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2010, 12:55:22 PM »
Dear Figleaf,

  We have all seen pictures of old minting techniques, of course, but I have never seen such a complete description so well explained  or with so many good illustrations of the development of the process itself.  Many thanks for this useful and interesting set of posts.

   Well done, and keep up the good work.

  Salvete
Ultimately, our coins are only comprehensible against the background of their historical context.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2011, 12:58:35 AM »
I couldn't resist adding an advertising medal with a splendid knuckle lever coin press from the collection of capnbirdseye. The whole medal is presented here

Peter

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Aernout

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2012, 09:41:40 PM »
From the "Monnaie de Bruxelles" 1910.

Token of the "open house days" of the Royal Mint of Bruxelles

The past and present day (anno 1910  ;D)

mvg,
Aernout
Start small to end magnificent - Start klein om groots te eindigen.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #21 on: February 05, 2012, 10:31:11 PM »
I believe there are two different metals/dates of this medal. I have spent quite a bit of time staring at the machine on the "today" side. It may be a planchet cutting machine. Not sure, though.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2012, 12:33:53 AM »
Here is a set of postcards from the Royal Mint c1911. #11 fits the image in the coin above.

Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2012, 12:38:59 AM »
4 more
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline malj1

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2012, 12:41:44 AM »
last 4
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #25 on: February 06, 2012, 12:46:20 AM »
The wrapper show details of postcards sold in aid of the Royal Mint Provident Society, price one shilling.
Malcolm
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #26 on: February 06, 2012, 11:01:00 AM »
Token of the "open house days" of the Royal Mint of Bruxelles

The past and present day (anno 1910  ;D)

Hmm, why did that look familiar to me? Ah yes. :) Voilà, the Dutch language version:
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,11738.0.html



Christian
« Last Edit: February 06, 2012, 11:06:19 AM by Figleaf »

Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #27 on: February 06, 2012, 11:09:40 AM »
Yes, that is a coin press as Malcolm shows in his picture Epa916.jpg above. Note that there are 25 years between the French and the Dutch version.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Aernout

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Start small to end magnificent - Start klein om groots te eindigen.

Offline Filat

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Re: Coin production techniques and machines
« Reply #29 on: February 08, 2014, 06:10:54 AM »
Between 800 and 1000, the world's biggest copper mine opened: Stora Kopparberg in Sweden. The mine produced so much copper, that for centuries, its production dominated the European markets. The Swedish kings tried to control the copper price by regulating the amount of copper they would sell, but this left them with unimaginable stocks of copper.

From 1644 to 1776, the Swedes would resort to striking huge copper plate coins. These pieces were much too large to be hammered. The Swedish solution was to strike a coin-like emblem in the four corners. They developed a heavy contraption to do this mechanically. The first illustration shows how the heavy plate was stamped. Next is a 1 daler plate coin (official weight 1970 grams), heavy and awkward, but at least it can be handled by one person. The largest is a ten daler piece 1644. The illustrations show the whole piece and the stamps used. Only the smallest values circulated widely. The larger values were widely used as ships' ballast, that could be sold wherever the market price was higher than in Stockholm.
I will add this interesting post .

Quote (translated from Russian ):

In the middle of XVII century issued their copper Daler .
After the defeat of the Great Northern War the Swedes had to pay a huge indemnity at the time , what went nearly all government silver stocks .
In addition, in the kingdom then observed a terrible inflation . So coin dalerov1644 10 years is a copper - plate casting weight of 18 kg, and released into circulation fifteen years later, the 8- plate - casting dalerovaya weighed 13 kg . DALERA smaller denominations , of course, been easier, but fabricated in the same manner . Initially cast billet , and then processed on the anvil hammers
to remove burrs and align convexity and smoothness . Thereafter, the plate
staged appropriate stamps , numbers , letters - created a legend, and " coin " was ready to trading on commodity- money market.
YV