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Funny euro denominations

Started by BC Numismatics, June 05, 2009, 02:20:18 PM

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BC Numismatics

Izotz,
  12 Euros is a bit of a strange denomination.Portugal has had the 8 Euros,Slovenia has had the 3 Euros,France has had the 1-1/2 Euros,& last,but not least,Ireland & the Isle of Man have had the 15 Euros.

Aidan.

chrisild

Quote from: BC Numismatics on June 05, 2009, 02:20:18 PM
12 Euros is a bit of a strange denomination.Portugal has had the 8 Euros,Slovenia has had the 3 Euros,France has had the 1-1/2 Euros,& last,but not least,Ireland & the Isle of Man have had the 15 Euros.

Strange? Not really. After all, these pieces are collector coins - nobody expects them to circulate and be used for payments. The €12 denomination refers to the pre-euro times: 12 euro is almost exactly 2000 pesetas, and before the euro came, several 2000 ptas commems were issued.

France stopped using the €1.50 denomination for silver pieces; that is used for brass coins now. Ireland only issued one €15 piece (and otherwise has €5 and €10 silver pieces). The Isle of Man is neither in the European Union nor a euro country.

Christian

Figleaf

At least some of those funny denominations can be explained by converting the denomination to the legacy currency. For instance, this piece corresponds roughly to FF 2.

I hadn't noticed before that the 4 in the denomination is incomplete ...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

bart

And please don't forget the Belgian gold coins of the series "Belgian kings" with denomination 12 1/2 euro!

bart

chrisild

Comes suspiciously close to 500 BEF. :)  Then again, the Belgian 500F coins were large silver pieces, I think, not small gold coins. So this may be a coincidence ...

Christian

Figleaf

From a Monnaie de Paris publication:

We are remodelling our face values in order to be consistent with or fellow Europeans. The old values were often complicated and bore no relation to their metal value and have been abandoned in favour of new, higher face values.

Hence, the € 1/4 and € 1-1/2 coins will be replaced with € 5 and € 10 coins.

In order to provide a more harmonious price range intended for the widest possible audience and to avoid overly large gaps, Monnaie de Paris  will be introducing Silver Piedfort coin with a face value of € 20.


Spain and Portugal still issue funny denominations. Any others? Austria already issues € 20 pseudo coins, which would be a logical next step for the stamped metal pushers.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Prosit

Quote from: Figleaf on June 23, 2009, 01:34:53 PM

Spain and Portugal still issue funny denominations. Any others? Austria already issues € 20 pseudo coins, which would be a logical next step for the stamped metal pushers.
Peter

I have several of the Austrian 20 Euro psuedo coins....also have a few 25 Euro psuedo coins from Austria...neither series are coins/medals I currently collect but interesting never the less.  For what I prolly should get for those coins, I could get a nice Marcus Aurelius or a really interesting Salzburg coin.

I really should sell off the stuff I am no longer interested in but that takes effort  ;D
Dale



Figleaf

Selling is always disadvantageous, because dealer margins are high. An auction would give you a better price, but at a higher cost and the risk of not selling. A trade would be good (try ourmember Miguel Mateo). Not buying stuff you don't want is probably best, but I fell into that trap often enough. Good decisions come from experience, but experience comes from bad decisions :'( Yes, those Salzburgers are relatively cheap compared to current pseudo coins and IMHO they're far more interesting.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Apart from the ones that have already been mentioned here, we don't have many strange denominations left. Well, Slovenia also has €30 "coins", and Spain also has €400 "coins" ... but 5, 10 and 20 for silver seem to be quite common. Austria has had €20 silver pieces since 2002, Belgium had the first in 2005, well, I won't "do" all euro countries now. But with such pieces, does the denomination actually matter?

And what the MdP states is only partly right. Seems they did phase the 0.25 and 1.50 silver collector coins out, but the 1 1/2 denomination will be continued (as a base metal piece). And I don't quite understand the part about those silver pieces having "no relation to their metal value". A new French collector coin with a face value of 10 euro and a silver content of 20g has a metal value of six euro something these days. How much does it cost? One issue costs 10 euro, all the others are proof only and cost roughly 45 euro. Now what relation was that again?

Christian

Figleaf

Excellent point, Christian. With my experience as a civil servant I would translate this as: people were complaining about what they had to pay for a mere 1/4 euro piece, so we just called them 5 euros and we expect them to be happy, or else ...

"Truth" is never important. Perception is what counts.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.