Author Topic: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China  (Read 837 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Aernout

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 341
    • CBNU
British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« on: January 16, 2016, 05:43:23 PM »
I'm looking for information, data and pictures of British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China.

5 Taels, 10 taels... others...

Somebody ??

Thanks !!!

gr,
Aernout
Start small to end magnificent - Start klein om groots te eindigen.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 281
Re: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2016, 02:43:01 PM »
The 5 tael seems to occur most. Eduard Kann mentions a 10 tael. In view of the date 1913, I suspect that this was one of the 20 European banks on the Bund in Shanghai on the aftermath of the boxer rebellion and before the overthrow of the Manchu dynasty. Note that on this page, Shanghai China Tourist Information mentions a Belgian bank on the Bund. However, I also found a banknote of the "Sino-Belgian bank" dated 1905. More info here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Aernout

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 341
    • CBNU
Re: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2016, 09:11:32 PM »
Thanks !

gr,
Aernout
Start small to end magnificent - Start klein om groots te eindigen.

Offline chinnotes

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 34
Re: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2016, 10:51:57 AM »
Two denominations of The British and Belgian Industrial Bank of China are known, 5 and 10 Liang (=Tael), dated 22nd August, 1913. There were, however, never issued, as the Hunan treasury in Changsha (capital of Hunan Province where the bank was located) were opposed to foreign control of the finance market. So, only unissued remainders, without seals, signatures, control number are known.
Altogether I saw more than 100 pieces of the 5 Tael note, but only 2 of the 10 Tael note. One 10 Tael note was in the collection of Sup Loy, one I saw in the collection of the State Ermitage Museum, St. Petersburg.
Here I try to give a link where you may see scans of both notes:
http://sszlw.cn/PicList256_1.html

Erwin

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 281
Re: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2016, 12:18:18 PM »
Can you tell us more about the collection of Sup Loy? Never heard of it before...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chinnotes

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 34
Re: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2016, 12:55:40 PM »
Well, Sup Loy, also known as Bo Wen, was born in 1922. His original name –in official pinyin romanization- was Lu Shibai (陸世百), = Sup Loy in Shanghai dialect (he was born in Shanghai). He had one of the best collections of Chinese notes ever accumulated. As under Mao Zedong, especially during the Cultural Revolution, it was forbidden to collect paper money (or coins), so he used other names, mostly Bo Wen, and published in Taiwanese magazines hundreds of articles on Chinese paper money. Most of these articles were reprinted in 2 volumes, issued by the Numismatic Society (Asia), Singapore, on Sept.1, 1999.
Sup Loy had a daughter living in the USA, and in 1982 he was able to emigrate to the USA. Part of his huge collection he could take with him. I met him in London, at the IBNS paper money show, when he was on his way to the USA. He died in Feb. 1999.
Later his daughter sold some single notes to collectors, and some parts of his collection were sold in auctions.
In a few days, a (small) part of this collection will be on auction in Shanghai: Yangming Auctions, May 15-16, 2016. Amongst these notes are some rather scarce ones: P.S2522, P.S2523, P.S2526, P.S2527. They are estimated at 10.000 Yuan each (I believe about 1540 US $), but usually are sold at distinctly higher prices.

Erwin

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 281
Re: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2016, 08:34:32 PM »
Thank you. An incredible story. Not only did hid collection survive, but also, he could emigrate, take part of his collection with him and publish in Taiwan. A multiple miracle. Maoists destroyed so many items because they were old, beautiful or both that Mao didn't have to be a world class mass murderer also to become the most loathed person in Chinese history. I am often amazed at people's capacity to overlook.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chinnotes

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 34
Re: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2016, 12:15:16 AM »
When the Cultural Revolution began in 1966, the three most famous collectors of Chinese banknotes in China were Sup Loy, Wu Chouzhong  (吴筹中), and Xu Feng (徐枫). These three gentlemen were afraid that they would be forced to destroy their notes. To save their notes, they decided to give them to the Shanghai Museum (上海博物館). This is the reason why their notes survived.  In 1976, when the Cultural Revolution had ended, they got many notes back, but the most important ones were kept by the museum. These were officially regarded as “donation”.
In August 2014 the Shanghai Museum published a book about notes from the Wu Chouzhong collection: 吴筹中先生旧藏纸币精粹  or “The Cream of the Late Mr. Wu Chouzhong’s Paper Money Collection” (481 pages), and in the preface we can read “In 1979 he donated 5216 pieces of his paper money collection to the Shanghai Museum”. And his granddaughter, Ms. Wu Danmin, became a staff member of the Museum…

Erwin

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 281
Re: British & Belgian Industrial Bank of China
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2016, 11:45:13 AM »
Ahhh. That makes clever sense. At least, the banknotes survived. Thank you for the details, chinnotes.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.