Author Topic: Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016  (Read 2536 times)

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Offline eurocoin

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Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« on: December 30, 2015, 09:10:14 AM »
Old obverse:



New obverse:



 
« Last Edit: October 30, 2016, 01:19:51 PM by <k> »

Offline Bimat

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Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2015, 09:16:11 AM »
So they are using the actual CoA after so many years?!?!

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2015, 09:34:08 AM »
Will the smaller coins not affected?

Offline eurocoin

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Re: Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2015, 09:37:40 AM »
Will the smaller coins not affected?

No changes in the obverse of the 10 and 50 kopecks coins (the obverse of these coins doesn't show a double-headed eagle).

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2015, 01:50:46 PM »
In addition, they are replacing denomination in words on obverse by proper name of the nation.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2015, 07:48:04 PM »
From Wikipedia:
"The coat of arms of the Russian Federation derives from the earlier coat of arms of the Russian Empire which was abolished with the Russian Revolution in 1917 and restored in 1993 after the constitutional crisis. Though modified more than once since the reign of Ivan III (1462–1505), the current coat of arms is directly derived from its mediaeval original, with the double-headed eagle having Byzantine and earlier antecedents from long before the emergence of any Russian state."
See image
1. Coat arms of Moscow (XV century).
2. The coat of arms of the Russian Empire.
3. The arm of the Russian Republic (14.09-07.11.1917, before the Bolshevik Revolution).
4. The arm of the Russian Federation (30.11.1993 - ?????).
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2016, 02:10:41 PM »
So they are using the actual CoA after so many years?!?!

No, All 25 Rouble coins issued as Sochi Olympics which were almost circulation coins ( due to very high mintage, base metal and issued at face value) used the actual CoA and full name. In fact, they were precursor of the  lower denomination change of obverse.

Issued in different reverse over period 2012 to 2014

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2016, 06:45:22 AM »
1 Ruble is out now

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Russia: Modified obverse circulating coins 2016
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2016, 02:43:51 PM »
The bi-cephalic eagle is a Roman concept (looking East and West, therefore symbolising the split Roman empire), used by Byzantium, the Bulgarian empire, the Greek catholic church, the Austrian empire and it successors and probably others. There's nothing to stop the modern Russian state from using it. Heraldic elements are not propriety. They serve only to recognise loyalty at a distance. The breast shield with the Moscow arms is perfectly OK also, especially since Moscow is Russia's capital, since it will clearly distinguish the Russian and Austrian arms. Incidentally, the Austrians are using the arms of Vienna as a breast shield.

The case is different for the crowns, sceptre and globus cruciger attributes, even though they are also Roman in origin. The crown was originally a metallic diadem of laurel. The sceptre was a symbol of imperial power, originally taller than a man and the globus was an attribute of Zeus, holding the world in his hand, modified by a cross to indicate christianity. They are political symbols: empire or emperor/czar, royalty and divine power or at lease god-approved (dei gratia.) The symbolic value of crowns has diminished through liberal use by marketeers, but the sceptre and globus have remained symbols of hereditary rulers of nobility, which Putin isn't.

Walking through Moscow, you get to see many buildings housing state institutions. The arms on them are quite different, giving an impression of either sloppiness or ignorance of heraldry. That may be the best way to interpret the arms on these coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.