Author Topic: Today's "discovery": Makeshift illuminated flat panel for coin photography  (Read 2626 times)

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Offline Overlord

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Using an illuminated flat panel as a background helps avoid shadows while photographing the coin. After opening a white image as background, a phone, tablet, or laptop screen makes for an acceptable substitute. (But be careful the coin does not scratch the screen!)


Offline Figleaf

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Re: Today's "discovery": Makeshift illuminated flat panel for coin photography
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2015, 04:41:25 PM »
And you get the white background by opening e.g. an empty Word page? Or do you want more light from below? In that case, there are several apps to use the phone or pad as a flashlight.

If you don't need light from below, wouldn't a sheet of paper work just as well?

Sorry, I know nothing about photography...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Overlord

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Re: Today's "discovery": Makeshift illuminated flat panel for coin photography
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2015, 05:00:42 PM »

If you don't need light from below, wouldn't a sheet of paper work just as well?

Peter
The main purpose here is to avoid the shadow of the coin.

Offline Levantiner

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Re: Today's "discovery": Makeshift illuminated flat panel for coin photography
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2016, 03:49:01 PM »
I used to use this technique  a lot. As my skills and equipment improved I abandoned it.  For some coin photography work I use enlarger lenses( they have a very flat field of focus which is ideal for coins)  with some of those lenses the back lighting recommended in this thread caused really nasty flare.   The other reason I stopped using this approach was the adoption of editing coin photographs in Adobe Photoshop elements. It has a circular crop tool so  I add the background( of any color) during editing.