Author Topic: Altered designs - same denomination  (Read 2588 times)

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Offline <k>

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Altered designs - same denomination
« on: October 09, 2015, 10:16:49 PM »
Sometimes we see that a design has been significantly altered or updated on a coin, for whatever reasons. Here I am interested in occasions when a coin design has been updated but remains on the same denomination. This also occurs without any significant gap in time.

If a design is repeated on a different denomination, then it does not belong in this topic: an example would be the woodcock design that moved from the Irish farthing to the decimal 50 pence. Likewise, old circulation designs that are commemorated on one-off circulation coins also do not belong here. In both the cases mentioned here, the designs should be posted in the following topic:

Numismatic heritage: old designs on new coins.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2015, 10:19:45 PM »


Images courtesy of COINZ.eu





Old bee, newer bee design.



Norway issued a new design series in 1958. It featured wildlife. For some reason, the design featuring a bee, which appeared on the 10 øre coin, was altered in 1959 and retained afterwards.

 
« Last Edit: June 14, 2019, 10:55:45 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2015, 10:21:22 PM »






The same thing happened on another coin of the series. There are two versions of the 2 øre reverse. The 1958 issue shows the grouse on a plinth. After 1958, the crossed hammers mint mark is moved next to the date, and the lettering is considerably larger. The grouse also looks somewhat different: it no longer stands on a plinth, and its face is turned in a somewhat different direction. The depiction of the bird has been somewhat simplified and looks more stylised. Does anybody know the reason for these changes?

 
« Last Edit: May 11, 2019, 08:05:51 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2015, 10:24:22 PM »
In 1982, the UK removed the word "NEW" from the legends on its coinage. If you look at the difference in the reverses of the five pence with "NEW" (left) and without it (right), you will notice that various changes have been made to the thistle.

1] The cross on the crown originally came much closer to the legend than on the new version.

2] The two cross-like ornaments rising from the rim of the crown have been reduced in size on the new version.

3] The flower of the thistle, which supports the crown, is considerably narrower on the new version.

4] On the new version, the leaves of the thistle extend further downwards than before.

5] Look at the stem of the thistle. On the new version, it is longer, thicker and more detailed than before, and the stems of the leaves start higher up the thistle stem than before.

6] On the new version, look at the shape of the leaves - top and bottom. There seem to be more prickles at the bottom of the leaves, and they are longer too, and there are also longer prickles at the left and right hand sides. On close inspection, you will see that the overall shape of the leaves has changed considerably.

7] The shape of the numeral 5 seems to be subtly different in the new version. On the old version, there is a noticeable upward tail at the right hand side of the horizontal top bar of the numeral - this has disappeared on the new version. There may be other slight differences between the numerals (width), but the images are not detailed enough for me to be sure.






 
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 11:50:15 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2015, 10:24:59 PM »






There were also considerable differences between the older and newer versions of the Britannia design on the reverse of the fifty pence.

1] On the older version, the trident appears closer to the rim.

2] On the newer version, Britannia is holding the trident at a lower angle. This is presumably to avoid overlapping the letter "T" in the word "FIFTY".

3] On the newer version, the crest of Britannia's helmet is wider than before, and the top right-most point of the crest extends further.

4] On the older version, the bottom-most point of Britannia's helmet has a small upward curl to it. This has disappeared on the newer version.

5] On the newer version, Britannia's profile looks somewhat different and seems to be broader than before.

6] On the newer version, Britannia appears to have less hair falling onto her neck.

7] On the older version, Britannia appears to facing more to the front than on the previous version. This has the effect of making the outline of her breasts look more pronounced than on the newer version. More of her stomach is visible, as it is turned more towards us, and you can see more of how the folds of her dress fall.

8] Britannia is sitting in an apparently more "comfortable" position on the newer version, so that her thighs and knees are held higher up.

9] On the newer version, Britannia appears to have fewer folds in her dress, yet the folds at the bottom left, close to the shield, look more complex than in the older version.

10] On the older version, the two main crosses on the representation of the Union Flag on Britannia's shield run together; on the newer version, they are clearly separated by a dividing line.

11] On the newer version, the sprig Britannia is holding appears to have broader leaves. And look at the right-hand side of the sprig on the older version: there are three leaves growing together in a cluster; this threesome has disappeared on the newer version.

12] The fur on the lion's front appears to extend further to the right on the older version. And on the newer version, there is now a gap between the bottom part of the lion's front fur and its feet - though I am not sure whether they are meant to be the lion's feet or whether it is the bottom of Britannia's robe piled up on the floor.

13] On the older version, the numeral zero in the figure fifty seems to be narrower than in the newer version.

These are all the major differences I can see. There do seem to be some other minor differences, but these may simply be down to the different amounts of wear on the coins in the images.

 
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 11:51:33 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2015, 10:31:05 PM »
Since the 1960s, Guatemala has regularly amended its circulation designs.





The rather eerie Quirigua Monolith, seen here on a Guatemalan 10 centavos coin of 1994.





The first version, seen on the 1952 coin.





This 1964 version is my favourite.  But does anybody know WHY Guatemala amends its designs so regularly?

 
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 11:53:45 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2015, 10:32:43 PM »


Guatemala, 25 centavos, 1950.





Guatemala, 25 centavos, 1964.





1998, and extra detail has been added.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2015, 10:34:59 PM »


Guatemala, 5 centavos, 1950.  The kapok tree, or silk cotton tree.





1966.





1977.





Year 2000.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2015, 10:41:55 PM »


Paraguay now: 5 guaranies of 1978.  A Paraguayan woman holds a jug.





1992, and spot the differences. So why does Paraguay also play this game? Our Paraguayan member of German descent, Hans, once told me that it is done so that the use of copyright does not become too expensive. This implies that the designer is given a fee (commission) that increases depending on the number of years his design is used, for example: year one - 1000 units; year two - 1500 units; year three - 2000 units. Can this really be the case?
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Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2015, 10:43:02 PM »


Paraguay, 50 guaranies, 1975.   Acaray River Dam.





And here is the 2008 version, heavily amended.
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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2015, 12:48:41 AM »
Does anybody have any more examples?

Bangladesh 5 Taka
SCWC has assigned different KM#s to them

Offline <k>

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2015, 02:15:25 AM »
List of Bangladesh 5 Taka Coins.

You can see them in the topic above, but it doesn't explain sufficiently what the differences are. To my eyes, they look as if they all apply to the legends only.
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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Altered designs - same denomination
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2015, 03:45:35 AM »
Not all differences are in the legend alone.
There is a redesign of the image of the bridge too.