Author Topic: What is 'Antique Finish'?  (Read 1121 times)

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Offline Bimat

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What is 'Antique Finish'?
« on: September 25, 2015, 10:53:44 AM »
There are quite a few pseudo collector coins (mostly produced by The Royal Australian Mint but there are other producers too) from a number of nations which are sold with description 'Antique Finish'. What does it really mean? If I understand it correctly, the coins are produced to look like they 'old' or 'antique'. Is that correct?

My next question is how is this effect achieved?

Aditya
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Offline Bimat

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What is 'Antique Finish'?
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2015, 10:56:40 AM »
Here's an example of 'Antique Finish' coin: An Australian $5

https://eshop.ramint.gov.au/2015-5-Magna-Carta-Coin/210387.aspx

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Offline @josephjk

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Re: What is 'Antique Finish'?
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2015, 11:06:47 AM »
Coins are harshly cleaned so there are surface hairlines in the fields.  A  colored toning oil is applied and the excess is rubbed off so the coin looks old. The coin surface is then sealed and buffed with a wax or some such....

Offline Bimat

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What is 'Antique Finish'?
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2015, 11:16:02 AM »
Coins are harshly cleaned so there are surface hairlines in the fields.

Thanks Joseph! I'm amazed to see that coins are 'harshly cleaned'. Doesn't that go against modern mints' basic principle of not cleaning the coin because it reduces its value? ;D

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A  colored toning oil is applied and the excess is rubbed off so the coin looks old. The coin surface is then sealed and buffed with a wax or some such....


Does this mean that the coin is actually stored in wet (or semi-wet) condition? ???

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Offline @josephjk

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Re: What is 'Antique Finish'?
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2015, 11:53:09 AM »
It's more likely that the dies are scrubbed to show lines (instead of scrubbing the coins) so there are lines on the coin surface after minting. The whole idea is to make a bright newly minted coin look old. The toning oil will rub off with handling, that is why a sealer is applied to the surface to lock in the color from the oil.

Offline Abhay

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Re: What is 'Antique Finish'?
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2015, 01:05:25 PM »
Dear Aditya,

For Silver, the antique finish can very easily be achieved by putting the silver article in an atmosphere with high sulphur content. An easy way is to put the silver article in the crushed BOILED EGG YELLOW, which is rich in sulphur  content.

A video which shows the whole process : http://jewelrymakingjournal.com/how-to-oxidize-sterling-silver-and-copper-with-boiled-eggs/

Abhay
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Offline malj1

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Re: What is 'Antique Finish'?
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2015, 03:09:21 PM »
I have a 1970 Captain James Cook National Trust of Australia Victoria Medal, these were given an "Antique" finish at the time of issue being darkened in the recessed areas and around the lettering.

See here
Malcolm
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Offline Bimat

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What is 'Antique Finish'?
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2015, 04:55:15 PM »
Dear Aditya,

For Silver, the antique finish can very easily be achieved by putting the silver article in an atmosphere with high sulphur content. An easy way is to put the silver article in the crushed BOILED EGG YELLOW, which is rich in sulphur  content.

A video which shows the whole process : http://jewelrymakingjournal.com/how-to-oxidize-sterling-silver-and-copper-with-boiled-eggs/

Interesting! But then, I also notice that these antique finish coins are not as largely produced as other varieties (like proof or matte). Any particular reason why? Is it an expensive process?

I have a 1970 Captain James Cook National Trust of Australia Victoria Medal, these were given an "Antique" finish at the time of issue being darkened in the recessed areas and around the lettering.

See here

That's a cool looking medal! 8)

This is yet another very informative thread on WoC. Thank you all!!! :)

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.