QEII: The Longest Reign

Started by <k>, September 01, 2015, 05:51:54 PM

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<k>

UK crown 2015.jpg



The Longest Reign.jpg


On 9 September 2015, Elizabeth II becomes the UK's longest reigning monarch. The Royal Mint site is showing various collector coins that celebrate the occasion. Artist James Butler has created yet another portrait of the Queen, and he also designed the crown that appears on the reverse. Meanwhile Royal Mint artist Stephen Taylor has created a reverse design that shows all five circulating UK portraits of the Queen
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

augsburger

The second portrait is different. There is more neck seen on the original, also just looks different to me.

Alan71

The first portrait is similarly different.  The neck is rounded on the original.  Presumably they've done it like this so that all five are similarly couped.  It's about time we had a coin with all the portraits on, so I'm glad they've done this.

<k>

James Butler has himself produced a fine portrait. I much prefer it to Jody Clark's new circulation portrait.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Alan71

Perhaps it's a reject from the shortlist of designs for the new portrait.  The crown appears to cover up more of the Queen's hair than in the actual one, making it look bigger.  I also find it odd that, not only does the new portrait depict her in the same crown as in the Maklouf one, but also the same earrings!

It's a pity this five-portrait design appears on the relatively small £20 and not the larger £5 coin.  The crown design would still look big enough on the £20, but the five portraits will be very small.

Alan71

The five-portrait design does appear on larger coins too, but you'd have to part with a minimum of £395 to get one (for the five-ounce silver proof coin).  Meanwhile, if you have a whopping £42,500 to spare, the gold proof kilo coin can be yours!  Order quick as just 15 are available!

Whilst the portraits are modified in the actual design, the original versions are seen in silhouette in the packaging of the £20 coin.

Bimat

Quote from: Alan71 on September 03, 2015, 12:27:06 PM
Meanwhile, if you have a whopping £42,500 to spare, the gold proof kilo coin can be yours!  Order quick as just 15 are available!

I wanted to buy one but they were asking too much for shipping, so I passed the offer. >:D

Jokes apart, but I won't mind getting the base metal version one day... :)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Bimat

#7
50 Pounds.jpg

Here's the latest £50 coin. You can buy it for £50, mintage: 100,000.

Link

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

augsburger

People thought they'd be an investment, in a few years they'll be nothing, they'll be so many different denominations and things, that people will look at the rubbish silver content and not bother.

Bimat

I have seen a couple of auctions where £100 coins were sold for much below face... >:D

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Alan71

These face value coins are for stupid people aren't they?  I mean, people who know nothing about silver and nothing about coins.  The silver content is way below face value. I have just bought the silver bullion £2 coin for £16.80 that has one ounce of fine silver in.  Much better value and much more silver for your money, but because the nominal face value is only £2 and it costs nearly £17, the general public will think it's not as good value as the tiny £20 for £20 (or £50 for £50, £100 for £100 etc) even though they are never likely to spend them as money.

Bimat

Quote from: Alan71 on December 01, 2015, 02:47:05 PM
These face value coins are for stupid people aren't they?  I mean, people who know nothing about silver and nothing about coins.  The silver content is way below face value. I have just bought the silver bullion £2 coin for £16.80 that has one ounce of fine silver in.  Much better value and much more silver for your money, but because the nominal face value is only £2 and it costs nearly £17, the general public will think it's not as good value as the tiny £20 for £20 (or £50 for £50, £100 for £100 etc) even though they are never likely to spend them as money.

The day is not too far when Royal Mint will start making £200, £500, £1000 coins and issue them for face value. France does it regularly (€5, €10, €25, €50 and €100 are silver, €250, €500, €1000 and €5000 are gold, all made available for face). As long as people are buying them from the mint, they should be happy... ;)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

milkshakespeare

Quote from: Alan71 on December 01, 2015, 02:47:05 PM
These face value coins are for stupid people aren't they?

If they are treated as real money by banks and other such institutions, I see no significant difference between these coins and high value banknotes. Banknotes of higher value are often difficult to spend in normal day to day conditions, but still you get it for 100 pounds and there's a way to get rid of it for 100 pounds.

Figleaf

The difference is subtle, but important. High value banknotes are issued with the intention to facilitate payments only. High value coins' only objective is commercial success. Since I pay taxes in France, I profit from high value French coin issues (they diminish somewhat the appetite for tax increases and deliver seigniorage), but suffer from the issue of high value banknotes in France (a cost item with a very limited contribution to economic efficiency, while contributing to organised crime).

Only my interest as a coin collector make me loathe such coin issues without function or significance. As a tax payer, I should cynically welcome them.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Bimat

Are these £20, £50 and £100 coins (which are issued for face) officially declared as 'legal tender'? Whether shops or even banks accept them is entirely a different question...

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.