Author Topic: Mysterious soviet countermarks  (Read 1105 times)

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Offline MORGENSTERNN

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Mysterious soviet countermarks
« on: July 26, 2015, 05:54:12 PM »
Hello,
I got a countermarked 200 cash from Szechuen (Y#454) with some unknown soviet countermarks.
I get that coin in 2013 from a chinese seller that never sold me any questionable coin.
Then 2 other coins with the same kind of countermark appears in 2014 (from a different seller)
Here the pictures of those 3 coins

I think it's maybe some trial strike before using definitive stamp for the countermarked issues (as KM#650k or the examples with hammer & sickle inside a star that appears sometimes in auctions)

What is your opinion about them ?

Offline MORGENSTERNN

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Re: Mysterious soviet countermarks
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2018, 07:10:53 PM »
Hello,
No answer after more than 2 years  ???
So it may be good to exhume that topic ...
I can't believe that there is nobody with informations about those issues and maybe some members linked with Chinese collectors could help ?
Thank you.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mysterious soviet countermarks
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2018, 08:02:44 PM »
In the long transition period to communism, the situation in China was confused (an euphemism, no doubt). Any good blacksmith could have produced counterpunches, any local firebrand could apply them. Those counterpunches may well still exist and there is no way to check when they were applied. I recently visited a special exhibition in the British Museum that showed Chinese money countermarked with Soviet style symbolism. They are unlikely to be Soviet, Mao didn't like the hammer and sickle symbol and preferred the red star, but presumably not everyone knew. They are likely to be Soviet inspired.

KM lists a number of pieces from this period (China - Chinese Soviet Republic, the last part of the China, People's Republic section.) I have heard serious people say they included fantasies and I have heard there is a lot more out there. Both may be right. The underlying problem is that China is world champion when it comes to fakes, fraud, imitation and swindling (and, incidentally, forum spamming). I am speaking for myself only, but I think this area is no longer collectable. Maybe I am just having a bad hair day...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.