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S&T, Key Date, Netherlands 1924 Cent

Started by Prosit, July 22, 2015, 05:49:47 AM

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Prosit

I added this little coin to my collection recently.

Considering world cents/pennies/ and equivalents:
I think the decimal issues of the Netherlands cents started in 1860 and ended in 1980. But I am not counting any euro-cents which are a worthy enough group to collect in their own right.

For no apparent reason I can put my finger on, a while back I decided to collect them by date and variation 1860-1980, 120 years. Not really a beautiful series per se but one I feel a strong attraction to for some reason; it is never-the-less a nice little side project and something I do occasionally (or maybe obsessively  ;)) but mostly just for fun and only with some select few series from around the world. Again with no apparent reason other than maybe availability and the ability to acquire them fairly easily.

If I am not mistaken the cent with the lowest mintage in that series is the 1924 issue with 1.4 million issued. Depending on condition the catalog lists them as costing between $12 in Fine to $230 in BU (Brilliant Uncirculated). I am skeptical of the catalogs accuracy for prices but still not a coin you normally will find in a dealer's junk box.

Not being a collector that is too concerned with grading as long as I like the price for the grade, I got this one. Quite proud of it.  Only need 5 or 6 more out of that 1860-1980 series.

Had a lot of help from many folks and several from WoC's

Thanks!
Dale

Figleaf

Good stuff, Dale. Glad you enjoyed putting the series together. Fortunately, there are not too many varieties (1901 and 1966 come to mind), though plenty of wildly expensive patterns. Wondering why your starting date is 1860, not 1819? You could make a case to exclude the Brussels cents and 1924 would still be key. You are quite right not to trust catalogue quotes. There is no market deep enough for correct price formation. The most expensive place to get them is the Netherlands.

My suggestion is to include a Belgian two centimes struck over one Dutch cent on your want list. It's not expensive, but not easy to find either and the sort of piece of history that would complete your set wonderfully.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Prosit

1860 was my starting point because the entire run of earlier KM #'s have some expensive dates in them. I do have an 1837.
I will definitely add earlier ones but maybe not the entire date series.

I think I will do the same with the eurocents, Aruba, Curacao, Netherlands Antilles and Netherlands Indies.
It is always fun to have an extra project or two like this. Still working on Great Britain Pennies 1797-present too.

Dale

THCoins

As a Dutchman it is almost unavoidable that i also have quite a lot of these. Peter may be right that these are fairly expensive when bought with coindealers in the Netherlands. But most collectors have some from private sources. One of my first collection coins was a 1915 cent which i found on the street in the 1970's. I also recovered a 1905 cent from between the floorboards in a house renovation. Note that the best quality specimen between 1913 and 1930 are supposed to be very dark as these were blackened before circulation. Nice to see you working on this series.

Prosit

#4
It is quite a fun series and I am down to needing 1882, 1884, 1896, 1898, 1900 Oval 0's and 1926
Not counting any colonies or earlier than 1860.

I usually don't get dedicated to finishing any series or working on any one country for long but will get them as the occasion arises. I enjoy the freedom of
my scattered focus in collecting.

Dale

Pellinore

Nice to see someone interested in these elementary Dutch coins. There are some slight differences in design in the course of time, pertaining to the drawing of the lion's head, the number of blocks in the field around the lion and the dimension of the value and decorations. Personally I like the later cent most, it's more harmonious (1913-1941). I prefer the full oranges and leaves to the skinnier leaves and fruits from 1907 and earlier. 1901 has two variations, one with 'KONINKRIJK' (meaning kingdom) and 15 blocks in the field, the other one with 'KONINGRIJK' and 10 blocks in the field. Of 1931 there appears to be a dark and a light bronze variation.
And then there are the cents from 1942 and 1943, minted for the Dutch colonies in Philadelphia, with exactly the same old Dutch design (not mentioning the name of Surinam and the Antilles), and 1957, 1959 and 1960.
-- Paul

Prosit

As for variations I have the 1969 cock and fish privy, the 1966 large and small dates and the 1901 10 and 15 shields. I was looking to add the 1900 Oval 0 (I think) but got the wrong one  ;D That is ok as the round 0 I got is in better condition than the one I had. Glad to get it.  Actually till I have both side by side to look at I am still unclear what is what. Dummy me.  ???

I do have a 1944-D Curacao 2-1/2 cents but none of the cents. I look forward to chasing a few of those but I am still not 100% clear yet about what is difference in Netherlands, Curacao and Suriname. I am sure a quick little study will clear that up for me.

Dale

THCoins

Just to tempt you. My earliest (decimal) Netherlands cent (1823 Utrecht)

Prosit

Here is my earliest. Actually it is my oldest Netherlands coin of any denomination.
Dale

Figleaf

You'd never know it from looking at the coins, but this was a period of profound change for the country. The house of Orange had at last acquired the title of king (hence the crowned W), only to see its royal prerogatives eroded by constitution and liberals. The federal republic had become a unitary state and included the Habsburg lands, only to see those lands break away again. There finally was freedom of religion in theory also, only to see "no church affiliation" win out. The economy was flourishing, only to see the Americans renege on their public debt, largely held by Dutch banks. The currency was turned decimal, only to have people attach pre-decimal coin names to decimal coins: stuiver for the 5 cent, dubbeltje for the 10 cent, kwartje for the 25 cent, piek for the gulden, daalder for an amount of 1.5 gulden and rijksdaalder for the 2.5 gulden.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.