Author Topic: Fake coins of the USA  (Read 13091 times)

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akona20

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2012, 03:14:06 AM »
I have seen a few that look "gold" over the years. Perhaps it was the container they were stored in.

Offline villa66

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2012, 06:04:31 AM »
This coin looks wrong, I'm afraid, a couple of different ways. As mentioned above, might we see the other side? And the weight? We might be able to tell from that.

 :) v.

Offline Einstein

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2012, 06:51:56 AM »
I have updated the other image. I think the metal of coin is brass but surely  not gold.
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Shekhar.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2012, 07:48:12 AM »
I suspect it's a contemporary forgery, which has either lost its silver coating or never received it. I have numerous similar pieces from the UK.

As others have said, the weight will be the clincher as to whether it is indeed brass or real silver that's gone a funny colour.

Although obviously it's nice to have the real thing, even if it turns out to be a forgery it is still a piece of history. Counterfeit currency produced at the same time as the coins being imitated was used in everyday life (you only have to look at the UK today to see that's true) and the motivations behind their production and use are linked to the economy, society and events in much the same way as the production and use of real coins are. Such pieces are, IMO, quite different from modern 'fantasy' pieces designed to fool collectors.

Offline Mackie

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2012, 12:55:52 PM »
Is it in its original packing cause it looks as if it is packed in a polythene bag and its kind of odd for a Morgan dollar.
Warm Regards,
Mackie

Offline villa66

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2012, 03:45:26 PM »
Let me help by giving the weight and diameter of a genuine silver Morgan dollar: 26.73 grams and 38.1 mm. And a picture to compare your piece with might help too...

 ;) v.

Offline Einstein

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2012, 04:46:47 PM »
The coin i have is definitely not a silver, cause the colour of that coin is yellowish. So i m stating that, the coin might be of BRASS. The question is to check, Which metal is used for the coins in the year 1898, for circulating coins?
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Shekhar.

Offline @josephjk

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2012, 04:51:36 PM »

Offline Einstein

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2012, 05:04:08 PM »
I think they were all silver
http://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces1492.html
It means, the yellow coin which i have is fake?
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Shekhar.

Offline PeaceBD

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2012, 05:13:53 PM »
I think this is a very bad fake. Morgan dollars are some of the most faked coins as they have such a huge market in USA.

BD

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2012, 05:17:01 PM »
I think this is a very bad fake. Morgan dollars are some of the most faked coins as they have such a huge market in USA.

BD

I suspect, though, that this was made at the time the dollar was circulating as a way of defrauding the US Treasury, not recently to defraud collectors. It therefore needed only to pass muster in the hands of a rushed shopkeeper or barmaid, quite possibly working in the light of an inefficient gas lamp. It wasn't intended to fool someone who knows all the numismatic finer points of Morgan dollars.

Offline PeaceBD

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #26 on: May 30, 2012, 05:27:46 PM »
I suspect, though, that this was made at the time the dollar was circulating as a way of defrauding the US Treasury, not recently to defraud collectors. It therefore needed only to pass muster in the hands of a rushed shopkeeper or barmaid, quite possibly working in the light of an inefficient gas lamp. It wasn't intended to fool someone who knows all the numismatic finer points of Morgan dollars.
I see what you are saying could be true. There is no way of determining if this coin is a contemperory fake based on the pics alone. It would help if the OP can share the information on the source as well as the price paid for this piece. There are collectors for these contemporary forgeries. Based on the rim and mushiness of the coin one can easily tell its not a real deal. As you might know these fakes coiming from a certain country are more easily and cheaply available on ebay and other sources than a true contemperory forgeries.

Offline villa66

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #27 on: May 30, 2012, 05:45:29 PM »
It unfortunately has the appearance of being intentionally "antiqued," which in my own mind tends to argue against its being a contemporary counterfeit.

 :) v.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #28 on: May 30, 2012, 05:59:58 PM »
There's 'antiqued' and there's, um, bright yellow. It could be a modern fake that's escaped from its creator before being coloured correctly, but it's unlikely that the colour has worn off (as is entirely possible with a fake intended to circulate -- I cite the UK £1 coins yet again).

As to the lack of detail, I suspect that's due to its having been cast, possibly in a mould created using an original coin that wasn't in the first flush of youth, rather than a direct attempt to make it look like it's seen more use than it has. This is a neutral observation as regards the purpose of the forgery, as forgers of both kinds have used the casting method, but I'd point out again that the level of authenticity needed to pass a fake coin in an ordinary commercial transaction is much lower than that needed to fool a collector.

Offline Einstein

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Re: Morgan dollar fake
« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2012, 06:09:30 PM »
I got this coin 10-12 years back. My father gifted it to me, he bought it from mumbai for me. At that time i had just started collecting commemorative coins of india.
So as i told earlier this was my 1st foreign coin.
Regards-
Shekhar.