Author Topic: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting  (Read 33700 times)

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Offline Gusev

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2015, 02:50:50 PM »
The best way to determine if plastic contains softener, harmful for a coin is: if the coin in it is expensive, the plastic contains softener. If the coin is cheap, the plastic is safe.

This is actually one of the many laws derived from Murphy's law.
Yes, Murphy's laws are the laws of our lives. This is my "desktop book"!

Who's an expert?
The universal definition of this book:

Weber's definition:
Expert - a man who knows more and more about less and less until he will know absolutely everything absolutely about nothing at all.

 ;D ;D ;D
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline malj1

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2015, 03:20:53 PM »
In promulgating your esoteric cogitations, or articulating your superficial sentimentalities and amicable, philosophical or psychological observations, beware of platitudinous ponderousity. Let your conversational communications possess a clarified conciseness, a compacted comprehensibleness, coalescent consistency, and a concatenated cogency. Eschew all conglomerations of flatulent garrulity, jejune babblement, and asinine affectations.

Let your extemporaneous descantings and unpremeditated expatiations have intelligibility and veracious vivacity, without rodomontade or thrasonical bombast. Sedulously avoid all polysyllabic profundity, pompous prolixity, psittaceous vacuity ventriloquial verbosity, and vaniloquent vapidity. Shun double-entendres, prurient jocosity, and pestiferous profanity, obscurant or apparent!! And, don't teach with big words.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #32 on: August 08, 2015, 05:15:03 PM »
OK.

Parable.
A long time ago an old aksakal (this is a very clever old man), numismatist in the second generation, said to me:
Lad, not collect cheap trash. This trash your children buried together with you. Or will sell to no avail and curse their parent. It is necessary to collect a few dozen such coins for which the buyer will stand in queue.
But it is collected what lay beneath their feet, in a purse or shine beautifully. Eventually they begin to buy good coin (1-2 per year). 90% lose interest and stop there.
Those who choose to continue (ideological numismatists) lead his collection in a decent view. But while 90% die of old age.

So while is not too late, listen to old aksakal.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #33 on: August 21, 2015, 06:27:42 AM »
Complete does not exist. Happiness does exist.

There is always a variety that is out of budgetary reach or all the known specimen are in museums. There is always another coin to collect.

However, even when the collection has "holes", all the collector has to do to enjoy it is to realise how truly unimportant the holes are in relation to what he has assembled.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2015, 07:21:34 PM »
"Collectors are the happiest people", Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #35 on: October 21, 2015, 08:47:19 PM »
Some prominent scientists believe collecting frivolous matter.
Ernest Rutherford, was a New Zealand-born British physicist who became known as the father of nuclear physics.

"All science is either physics or stamp collecting."

As quoted in Rutherford at Manchester (1962) by J. B. Birks
Unsourced variants:
    Unsourced variants:
    That which is not measurable is not science. That which is not physics is stamp collecting.
    Physics is the only real science. The rest are just stamp collecting.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline bgriff99

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #36 on: October 22, 2015, 12:33:19 AM »
Some prominent scientists believe collecting frivolous matter.


"All science is either physics or stamp collecting."


Anyone who says: "What I do is important, difficult, and valuable to humanity.   What everybody else does is stupid, easy and unimportant." instantly loses all credibility.   "Stamp collecting" is widely used as a pejorative for frivolous activity.    Something for children to occupy themselves.   At the point where people, adults of a certain age, lose themselves in minutiae of detail varieties of the same stamps they first collected perhaps 45 years previously, alright.   That is not the same as a child learning history, languages, geography, and a little about printing thrown in.    It does not acknowledge, in fact denies the arc of collecting for most people over their lives.   I am fully aware and remember the first thing I collected was acorns.   An easy link to the biological role of children in gathering food.   I still forage quite a bit.    I also collected rocks, keen on finding flint to knap, but of course also fossils.   Whether fossils, paintings, coins or scripophily, we stay with it for the beauty, history, learning and community.

Collecting and classifying per se are the foundation of science.   Science evolved from survival, making better tools, finding better food, making shelter.   Eventually it horned in on and usurped "story making" in the role of explaining the universe.   Physics sits at the crux of tool making and cosmology.  It does happen to be difficult to do.      That is a fine thing.   I strongly support history and physics versus fantasy and religion.   

But I would ask Dr. Rutherford if the people who figured out how to tan animal skins, weave and sew, make flint tools, invent writing and record history as it happened, discover medicinal plants, manufacture bronze, brass, steel, gunpowder, cast coins, domesticate animals, program computers, were physicists or stamp collectors.   

If his answer is :   "I mean now, not in the past", then he adds to arrogance a bias for the present.   "Modern" physics only exists on the prior work of metallurgists, chemists, electricians, engineers, glassmakers at the cutting edge of science of their day.    And then countless millions of artisans, factory workers, miners, farmers and soldiers without whom no advances would have had an impetus to be furthered.

A better division of science is into tool making and story telling.   It all starts with collecting:   flint, ore, fuel, plants and seeds, rocks, artifacts and documents.   Dr. Rutherford foists off much work on others, while denigrating them.   He is a glorified flint knapper, merely using all that calculus to devise a better spear point.   

Offline malj1

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #37 on: October 22, 2015, 04:52:18 AM »
A prominent Stamp and Coin shop in Melbourne Australia received a letter yesterday informing the shop and the entire arcade is to be demolished to to make way for a new underground line.

Max was on the TV news last night and is devastated, as he is now 94 so is somewhat too old to relocate! He has been in this location since 1956 and I have been a customer since around 1959.

https://www.maxstern.com.au/about-us/
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline aarkay

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #38 on: October 22, 2015, 10:04:12 AM »
A prominent Stamp and Coin shop in Melbourne Australia received a letter yesterday informing the shop and the entire arcade is to be demolished to to make way for a new underground line.

Max was on the TV news last night and is devastated, as he is now 94 so is somewhat too old to relocate! He has been in this location since 1956 and I have been a customer since around 1959.

https://www.maxstern.com.au/about-us/

Hi...

Remembering  the old quote...

“The old order changeth, yielding place to new,   
And God fulfils himself in many ways,   
Lest one good custom should corrupt the world."


The Passing of Arthur
Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron (1809–92)
From “Idylls of the King”

Aarkay

Why worry about dead yesterdays and unborn tomorrows….live in the present…a present for you today…

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #39 on: October 22, 2015, 10:19:22 AM »
he is now 94 so is somewhat too old to relocate! He has been in this location since 1956 and I have been a customer since around 1959.

I am a customer of Johan Mevius & son since 1959. At that time, he had just "promoted" himself from street seller to coin dealer/shopkeeper. His business went through a number of permutations. He ended up as coin book dealer with coins and medals as side business and finally moved out of Amsterdam, to a nice ex-farm in the East of the country (known as "the wilderness" in the West). He transferred the business to his son and bought a very nice house in the South of France, enjoying his retirement to this day.

- The lesson the first: one is not too old to move, but one may lack the funds or the family members to outsource the move.
- The lesson the second: when it's time to stop, stop.

Retirement does have its attractions also. Besides, you can do odd jobs and they are never routine, you are no longer in a traffic jam because of office hours and you don't have to keep on explaining to a "manager" who couldn't do your job if he wanted to what you have been doing, what you are doing and what you are planning to do.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline constanius

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #40 on: October 24, 2015, 03:30:09 AM »
That which is not physics is stamp collecting.
    Physics is the only real science. The rest are just stamp collecting.

I understand this as meaning that he thought that any science, biology, chemistry etc but excluding physics is unimportant or as he puts it "just stamp collecting" and nothing to do with collecting of any sort or everyday people, jobs etc, just the other, to him, lesser sciences.

Well if he had appreciate biology and medical science he might not have died when he did

 "For some time before his death, Rutherford had a small hernia, which he had neglected to have fixed, and it became strangulated, causing him to be violently ill. Despite an emergency operation in London, he died four days afterwards of what physicians termed "intestinal paralysis", at Cambridge"

A certain irony there.

Pat




Pat

Offline Prosit

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #41 on: January 21, 2016, 03:27:46 PM »
Just heard this elsewhere about buying coins in an area you aren't familiar with and though the thought is commonly expressed,  I liked the way it was phrased.

If you don't have a clue,
No purchases till you do.

Dale

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #42 on: January 21, 2016, 03:56:40 PM »
I am adventurous and go with a different one:

When in trouble or in doubt
Run in circles, scream and shout

In a place like Cairo, it's the more fun approach. Remember Indiana Jones in Cairo? :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #43 on: February 27, 2016, 04:20:21 PM »
Numismatics - pleasure from well spent leisure.
and
Professional Numismatics - pleasure from well work.

"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Wise thoughts about numismatics/coin collecting
« Reply #44 on: February 28, 2016, 12:27:46 AM »
A small gouge on a coin is damage. A big gouge is a cancellation, a counterstamp, a test mark or a political protest.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.