Author Topic: Sikh - Guru Nanakji Religious Medal  (Read 2068 times)

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Offline aliqizalbash

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Sikh - Guru Nanakji Religious Medal
« on: April 13, 2009, 07:32:44 AM »
The only thing I can make sense of in this is part of the Urdu text written at the very bottom [1st image]:

XXX DEVI DIYAAL CHOWK DARBAR XXX XXX ME BANA *with XXX obviously being the part which I can not make out, or am confused with*.

I'm sure someone would be able to help me out with the Hindi/Punjabi(?) script, origin, date and all.



« Last Edit: March 03, 2010, 03:58:36 AM by engipress »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Help - Token/Medal
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2009, 12:12:09 PM »
The ring makes it clear that the object is thought to have spiritual value and is meant to be worn as an amulet. The clear strike and the ring would make this a relatively modern object. Beyond that, there are others, more qualified than I to comment.

I like the scene of bliss. A comfortable seat, shadow and some music. I wonder what the person at right is doing/holding, though.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline aliqizalbash

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Re: Help - Token/Medal
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2009, 01:35:40 PM »
Of what I gather, the person on the left is holding a Sitaar [musical instrument] where as the one on the right is holding a torch/flame(?), symbolising fire maybe (?). The halo(?) around the guy sitting in the middle probably suggests that he is not a ruler rather a religious figure.

I personally think it's a Punjabi religious figure, then again someone will correct me out if I'm wrong regarding any of the above statements.

Regards,
Ali

Offline asm

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Re: Help - Token/Medal
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2009, 01:47:08 PM »
If I am not wrong the word below the image is 'GURU NANAK(ਗੁਰੂ ਨਾਨਕ )JI'. (I have no knowledge of Punjabi / Gurumukhi script except the knowledge acquired reading sign boards written in both English and Punjabi and there is a small chance that I am wrong.) Guru Nanak was the founder of the Sikh religion. The Guy to the right seems to be holding either a 'Mashal' (torch) or 'Pankha" (fan). They seem to be entertaining the Guru.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2009, 10:25:58 AM by asm »
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Offline Oesho

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Re: Help - Token/Medal
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2009, 03:28:46 PM »
ASM is quite right. This a Sikh religious token, showing on the obverse Guru Nanak, nimbate, seated on an asana (carpet) under a tree with two companions: Mardana, a Muslim musician playing a rebab, and Bala Sindhu, a Hindu, who holds a chowri (fly whisk).
Inscription in Gurmukhi below: Guru Nanakji
Reverse shows the so-called Mool Mantra in Gurmukhi and below an additional inscription in Persian script claming that Raja Darya Mal Devi Dayal of Chowk Darbar (Amritsar) had this token made in Austria (ASTARIA) (Raja Darya Mal Devi Dayal Chowk Darbar Arth/ Astaria me bana)
The 7 line text of the Mool Mantra in Gurmukhi reads:
1 Omkar / Sat nam, Karta Purakh / Nir bhau, nir ver, Akal / murat, Ajuni Sai bhang Gur / parsad, Jap, adi sa ch, jugad sach, hai bhi sa/ch, Nanak, hosi bhi sach.(There is but one God, True is His name, creative His personality and immortal His form. He is without fear, without enmity, unborn and self illuminated. By the Guru’s grace, He is obtained. Embrace His meditation. True in prime, true in the beginning of ages, true. He is true even now and true He verily shall be, O Nanak.)

This is a rare type token of exceptional fine craftsmanship. They may have been distributed by a merchant of Amritsar as a form of publicity.

Ref.: Hans Herrli, The Coins of the Sikhs (New Delhi 2004)
Michael Mitchiner, Indian Tokens, Popular Religious & Secular Art from the ancient period to the present day (London, 1998)
Ronya Nioyogi, Money of the People, some eighteenth and nineteenth century tokens of India (Calcutta, 1989)
Irwin F. Brotman, A Guide to the Temple Tokens of India (Los Angeles, 1970)
« Last Edit: April 13, 2009, 11:09:53 PM by Oesho »

Offline aliqizalbash

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Re: Help - Token/Medal
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2009, 04:22:07 PM »
Thank you once again for the help. Correct me if I'm wrong, it is hard (if not impossible) to determine the dates for such tokens/medals?

Furthermore, can you please clarify with what is written between Darbar and Austria? I take it as "Artah/Artuh/Arteh" [Alif, re, tay, hay].

I can not even approximate a date as I have not yet been able to find out references to Raja Darya Mal on the internet.

Regards,
Ali

Offline Oesho

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Re: Help - Token/Medal
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2009, 11:07:44 PM »
Furthermore, can you please clarify with what is written between Darbar and Austria? I take it as "Artah/Artuh/Arteh" [Alif, re, tay, hay].

I presume the word between Darbar and Austria is "Arth", a word that has many interpretation in Urdu, but could, in my opinion, in this case be translated as object or token.

Offline aliqizalbash

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Re: Help - Token/Medal
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2009, 04:46:35 AM »
Point noted, thanks again.