Circulation sets with a common obverse and a common reverse

Started by <k>, February 25, 2015, 05:12:33 PM

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<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya 1952.jpg

Libya 1952.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Ghana~.jpg


Ghana-~.jpg

Ghana, 1958. Disgracefully boring.  >:(
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Sierra Leone set-.jpg


Sierra Leone set.jpg

Sierra Leone in the 1970s and 1980s.

See also: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Brazil 1986-8.jpg

Brazil, 1986 to 1988.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

andyg

brazil.jpg

Brazil 1994 - spot the odd one out.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

<k>

Bolivia 2010, 2012-.jpg


Bolivia 2010, 2012.jpg

Bolivia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Costa Rica set.jpg

Costa Rica.  Apart from the different Braille values.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Mauritania set.jpg

The old Mauritania set, before 2017.

See: Coinage of Mauritania.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Sri Lanka set 2017.jpg

Sri Lanka, 2017.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Myanmar sset.jpg

Myanmar.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

quaziright


<k>

Bulgaria set 1951-4.jpg

Bulgaria, 1951 to 1954.


In 1952 it dropped the 25 stotinki and added a 20 stotinki instead.

How many countries have done that?
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Quote from: <k> on October 01, 2020, 09:55:19 PM
How many countries have done that?

Not sure, but Belgium went the other way ... sort of. They had 20c coins until nineteen-sixtysomething, then between the mid-1960s and mid-1970s used 25c. (But the "quarter" had been in use before.)

Christian

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.