Author Topic: Which countries use steel coins?  (Read 2904 times)

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Offline Globetrotter

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2015, 04:30:32 PM »
Hi,

mind you the 1939 from Italy is made of steel, but it is NOT attracted to magnet (so called non magnetic).  The 20 and 50 centisimi from 1939 to 1940 exist in magnetic and non magnetic versions!

Ole
Ole

If you're interested in coin variants please find some English documentation here:
https://sites.google.com/site/coinvarietiescollection/home
and in French on Michel's site (the presentations are not the same):
http://monnaiesetvarietes.esy.es/

Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2015, 05:43:25 PM »
So what's the difference?

"A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic."

Apparently the UK nickel-plated steel 5p and 10p coins (of 2012 and later) are magnetic.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2015, 05:47:17 PM »
The explanation regarding nickel is slightly counterintuitive, since pure Ni is itself magnetic (though more weakly so than iron). Pure nickel coins, such as those of 1960s-1990s South Africa, some WW2-era issues from Switzerland, pre-euro French "silver" and others, are magnetic, while standard Cu-Ni (25% Ni) is not.

Yes, the UK Ni-plated steel coins are magnetic. IME most coins made of steel (either wholly, or plated with something else) are magnetic; the Italian ones mentioned by Globetrotter are a strange exception.