Author Topic: Which countries use steel coins?  (Read 2912 times)

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Offline <k>

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Which countries use steel coins?
« on: February 17, 2015, 05:05:40 PM »
As you know, there is quite a trend for plated coins these days. Often they are coins with a steel core but plated with copper or nickel. However, many countries have used and do use wholly steel coins. Brazil, Italy and Turkey spring to mind. Again, they would be considered unacceptable in some Western countries. They have quite a greasy feel, so you can identify them by touch alone.

Another question - which country was the first to use steel coins?
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Offline andyg

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2015, 07:45:47 PM »
The earliest I can think of are 50 lire coins from Italy (by default there was a Vatican issue too) and 1 Colon coins from Costa Rica - dated 1954.
Brazil 50 Centavos is currently steel, as are Guatemala 5,10 and 25 Centavos -probably more out there!
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2015, 09:00:29 PM »
I think it takes more than a touch to identify steel coins. You may have been thinking of iron, which can indeed almost be identified by touch - personally, I think I would confuse iron, zinc and tin coins by touch. Iron is easiest identified by its oxide. Everyone knows what rusty iron looks like.

France used steel for its 1 and 5 centimes coins following the re-denomination of the franc.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2015, 09:04:30 PM »
Aren't the 50c, 1 and 2 lire coins from the late 1930s/early 1940s also steel?

Offline andyg

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2015, 09:18:51 PM »
Aren't the 50c, 1 and 2 lire coins from the late 1930s/early 1940s also steel?

so they are :) - so that makes it 1939 for Italy (and Albania)
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2015, 09:46:11 PM »
I think it takes more than a touch to identify steel coins. You may have been thinking of iron, which can indeed almost be identified by touch

Peter

Somebody gave me some Turkish coins in the 1980s. They felt different to me straightaway, and they were steel. Be careful, or we'll get EWC hurling epistemology, qualia and goodness knows what else into the discussion.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2015, 12:15:18 AM »
And this from someone who proudly proclaims to have all the wrong opinions? I think you are just jealous you were never hospitalised with epistemology. I'll have to inform the NHS about you. :D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2015, 12:28:10 AM »
India, Bangladesh and Srilanka have steel coins too, as their current coins.

Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2015, 11:13:00 AM »
And this from someone who proudly proclaims to have all the wrong opinions?

Peter

Wrong. I sometimes claim that everybody else has all the wrong opinions.   8)  There is no way you can know whether or not I can distinguish steel coins by touch, because our senses are not exactly aligned. If they were, I would agree with those people who think cheese tastes nice - but I don't.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2015, 11:14:05 AM »
India, Bangladesh and Srilanka have steel coins too, as their current coins.

Thanks, Pabitra. I imagine they are still uncommon in most of the West.
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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2015, 08:27:29 PM »
I imagine they are still uncommon in most of the West.

As per latest database of current circulation coins, 29 countries use steel in coins either as a standalone alloy or as core of bimetallic coins ( like Hungary, Mexico etc.)

As already indicated, they were started in West ( by Italy) and are minted by west for rest of the world ( e.g by Paris mint for Comoros, Central African States etc. or Kremnica for Sri Lanka etc.)
Nearest Western nations having steel coins could be Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan.

Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2015, 03:16:00 PM »
Nearest Western nations having steel coins could be Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan.

They may be west of you, but they don't fit my criteria of Western.
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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2015, 05:31:44 PM »
Western countries, according to your definition, are typically those which have either low inflation or their population depends on vending machines. In such economies, plated coins last longer since the central bank does not need to recall the coins after the death of a denomination.
In other countries, the demise of a denomination would result in large scale return of non useful coins. In case of steel coins, the result, in such case is melting of coins rather than return. This is a more efficient system.

Offline Globetrotter

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2015, 02:59:51 PM »
Hi,

out of my collection of 35.908 coins from 289 countries, I searched for coins made of Fe (Iron) or steel and found 66 countries only! I then took the first date of issue from each country and here is the list:
Ole

If you're interested in coin variants please find some English documentation here:
https://sites.google.com/site/coinvarietiescollection/home
and in French on Michel's site (the presentations are not the same):
http://monnaiesetvarietes.esy.es/

Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use steel coins?
« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2015, 03:38:03 PM »
Excellent list.  8)  So Italy does appear first, in 1939, along with Albania, though of course that Albanian occupation coin was also issued by the Rome Mint. I wonder if steel was specifically adopted as a war measure, then? History tells us that Mussolini was not ready for a general European war in 1939, though, and tried to dissuade Hitler from it. He even secretly informed the Belgians that the Nazis were planning to occupy them, en route to France.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.