Author Topic: Which countries use aluminium coins?  (Read 6127 times)

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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Which countries use aluminium coins?
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2015, 10:18:53 PM »
The Czech Republic's smallest denominations (10, 20, 50 haléřů) are/were aluminium. I don't know if any are still in circulation; my most recent is a 50 haléřů from 2008.

Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use aluminium coins?
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2015, 12:32:55 AM »
The Czech Republic's smallest denominations (10, 20, 50 haléřů) are/were aluminium. I don't know if any are still in circulation; my most recent is a 50 haléřů from 2008.

The lowest two were demonetised in 2003, and the 50 haléřů on 31 August 2008.

https://www.cnb.cz/en/banknotes_coins/coins
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Which countries use aluminium coins?
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2015, 12:40:54 AM »
I was in Prague recently and received CZK 1 (€0.035) and 2 coins from circulation.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Pabitra

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Re: Which countries use aluminium coins?
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2015, 10:10:18 AM »
Hi,

in 2013 these 14 countries still used Al coins, I only checked coins weighing up to 2.2

Good work, Ole.
The cut off year of 2013 and weight of 2.2 gms are limits, which may be debatable.

However, some countries not included have following details

Algeria 10 dinar is bimetallic with Aluminium core. The only bimetallic in the world which has both parts in white colour. 2013 year was issued.

Japan -1 yen - 2014 is issued.

Maldives - 1, 5 and 10 Laari have been issued in 2012, last two with new shape. No new coin of any denomination has been issued since the nation issues fresh coins after a gap of 4- 5 years. Yes, they all are below 1 gram.

Nicaragua - 10 centavos is 1.4 gram and was last issued in 2012. No coin of any denomination has since been issued.

North Korea - all coins are Aluminium and use frozen date of 2002.

Nagorno-Karabakh is not a recognised sovereign state and coins are fantasy issues.

Somali and Somaliland also may be considered disputed by some.

Thailand 1, 5 and 10 Satang are Aluminium and 2013 coins are with me. They come in set and will be minted if demanded by issuing banks. Very much like 1 and 2 cents of Belgium.

Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use aluminium coins?
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2015, 03:53:34 PM »
That is an implicit bet on energy getting cheaper, or at least not getting relatively more expensive. I bet that by the end of the century nobody alive will remembering this "prediction".

Peter

There will always be energy, though I know you are doing your best to scoff it all for yourself before you depart this life. I suspect that Jeremy Grantham (for it was he who predicted it, and he is no slouch) meant that the materials used to produce steel and aluminium would remain relatively plentiful, as opposed to, say, copper and silver.
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Offline Enlil

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Re: Which countries use aluminium coins?
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2015, 01:44:44 AM »
Costa Rica, Paraguay, Indonesia, North Korea.

Online Pabitra

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Re: Which countries use aluminium coins?
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2015, 10:49:57 AM »
Japan 1 Yen of Aluminium continues to be minted for 2015 too

Offline <k>

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Re: Which countries use aluminium coins?
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2015, 01:48:23 PM »
1 Japanese Yen equals 0.0056 British Pound Sterling. So surely the coin doesn't still circulate?
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