Author Topic: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?  (Read 2355 times)

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Offline Candy

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Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« on: February 14, 2015, 11:06:35 PM »
NOTE: This topic was split from Why we should scrap 1p and 2p coins.



But also the demise of the (now nominally) bronze and copper coinage which goes back to antiquity.  Future archaeologists will only have rusted unidentifiable coins from our era.

Yes , unfortunately so.



So 2 questions folks,

is any authority still issuing any coins in copper or bronze (for circulation not specimen sets)?

David

Its ironic you ask that question because I was lamenting this issue at the end of last year  :'(  and after extensive searches through the coinage of many countries I haven't found any country still issuing bronze coinage (its copper plated steel everywhere I look  >:D ) . Canada  was probably the last when they stopped making their pennies in bronze after the mid-90`s
« Last Edit: February 15, 2015, 05:54:14 PM by <k> »

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2015, 11:17:20 PM »
The Danish 50 øre coin is still made of bronze AFAIK.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2015, 11:30:29 PM »
Cu97 Zn 2.5 Sn 0.5 ... :)

Christian

Offline Candy

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2015, 01:15:17 PM »
The Danish 50 øre coin is still made of bronze AFAIK.

Super

Offline Prosit

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2015, 10:15:57 PM »
There are likely to still be some countries that use good coinage metal for higher denominations.
Not sure about any Bronze metal coins.

I think in the US the only archaic metal coin   >:D is the Nickel Nickel  ;)
Actually 0.750 Copper, 0.250 Nickel.


Dale


Offline Figleaf

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2015, 11:15:08 AM »
The Netherlands used bronze 5 cent pieces until the introduction of the euro.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2015, 06:46:03 PM »
There are likely to still be some countries that use good coinage metal for higher denominations.
Not sure about any Bronze metal coins.

I think in the US the only archaic metal coin   >:D is the Nickel Nickel  ;)
Actually 0.750 Copper, 0.250 Nickel.


Dale

There are plenty of countries still using standard Cu-Ni (i.e. 75% Cu, 25% Ni) for higher-denomination coins. The UK (20p, 50p, pill of £2), eurozone (pill of €1, ring of €2) and Australia (all "silver" denominations AFAIK) are cases in point. And the Australian 5c is worth less than the US nickel.

The thing with "copper" (as a colour rather than composition) is that it's overwhelmingly used for the lowest denominations, which obviously are the first candidates for money-saving alloy changes. The only extant currency that springs to mind where copper colour is used for a high denomination is the Czech korúna, where the 20 korún coin is copper-coloured. But it is copper-plated steel. The old (pre-1989) French 10 Fr and pre-euro Belgian 20 Fr coins also fell into this category and were bronze, but are obviously obsolete.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2015, 07:48:21 PM »
Cu-Ni (i.e. 75% Cu, 25% Ni) [...] eurozone (pill of €1, ring of €2)

Side note, somewhat unrelated to the OP's question ;) ... Both the €1 and €2 coins have a Magnimat pill, with a pure nickel core. The ring of the €2 piece is Cu75 Ni25 indeed, but the pill of the €1 coin is nickel inside and Cu-Ni plated.

Christian

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2015, 08:01:33 PM »
Aha, I didn't know that. Thanks for the clarification.

Offline Enlil

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Re: Which modern countries still use bronze coins?
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2015, 01:56:58 AM »
Japan 10 Yen.