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British West Africa

Started by <k>, February 07, 2015, 11:29:33 PM

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<k>

From Wikipedia:

The British West African pound was once the currency of British West Africa, a group of British colonies, protectorates and mandate territories. It was equal to the pound sterling and was similarly subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence.

In the 19th century, the pound sterling became the currency of the British West African territories and standard issue United Kingdom coinage circulated. The West African territories in question are Nigeria, the Gold Coast (now Ghana), Sierra Leone and the Gambia. There was a tendency for the existing United Kingdom sterling coinage in the West African territories to leave the region and return to the United Kingdom, hence causing a local dearth of coinage. This resulted in Britain setting up the West African Currency Board and issuing a distinctive set of sterling coinage for use in West Africa.

Liberia also adopted the British West African pound in 1907, replacing the Liberian dollar, despite the fact it was not served by the West African Currency Board. Liberia changed to the U.S. dollar in 1943. The British sections of Togo and Cameroon adopted the West African currency in 1914 and 1916 respectively after being taken from Germany. Beginning in 1958, the West African pound was replaced by local currencies in the individual territories.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
BWA 1-10d 1908-.jpg


The 1/10 of a penny was first issued in 1907.

It was made of aluminium and was probably the world's first aluminium circulation coin.

It was also issued in 1908, but it was then replaced by a copper-nickel version.


The legend stated "NIGERIA BRITISH WEST AFRICA".

This legend was retained until 1911 on all the coins.

The word "NIGERIA" was dropped from 1912 onward.

Nonetheless, Nigeria continued to be part of the currency union.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
BWA 1d 1907.jpg


The only other coin issued for British West Africa during the reign of Edward VII was the penny.

Like the 1/10 of a penny, it was holed and featured a hexagram.

However, this coin was made of copper-nickel from the start.

This time the hexagram does not intrude into the legend.

There is therefore a dash after "NIGERIA".
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
BWA 1d 1911.jpg


From 1911, coins were issued in the name of George V.

This 1911 penny still includes the word NIGERIA in the legend.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4
BWA 1d 1912.jpg


From 1912 the word NIGERIA was dropped from the legend.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5
BWA ½d 1919.jpg


A 1/10 of a penny and halfpenny were also issued in 1911

They were both in copper-nickel and included the word NIGERIA.

However, they are rather scarce.

Here is a 1919 version of the halfpenny.

The halfpenny was not issued during the reign of Edward VII.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6
BWA 3d 1915.jpg


A silver threepence coin was added to the series from 1913 onward.

This was the first denomination to carry the king's portrai.

However, the lower denominations remained without a portrait.

The reverse of the coin showed a rather old-fashioned wreath.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7
BWA 3d 1927.jpg


From 1920 to 1936, the threepence was issued in tin-brass.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8
BWA 6d 1925.jpg


The sixpence was first issued in silver, from 1913 to 1920.

From 1920 to 1936, it was replaced by a tin-brass version.

The reverse featured the same simple wreath that appeared on the threepence.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9



BWA 1s 1936 specimen.jpg


The shilling was issued in a silver version from 1913 to 1920.

A tin-brass version replaced it, starting in 1920, until 1936.

The reverse featured a palm tree.


Above you can see a version of the 1936 coin that is marked "SPECIMEN".

This never circulated, of course.

It was presumably used for test purposes in the Royal Mint.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10
BWA 2s 1913-.jpg


BWA 2s 1920.jpg


The two shillings coin was issued in silver from 1913 to 1920.

It was replaced by a tin-brass version from 1920 to 1936.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11
BWA 1d 1936.jpg


George V died in January 1936.

He was succeeded by Edward VIII, who reigned only until December of that year, when he abdicated.

A British West Africa  1/10 of a penny, a halfpenny and a penny were issued bearing his name.

No denomination was issued that bore his portrait.

East Africa, Fiji and New Guinea also issued coins that bore his name but did not carry his portrait.


See: King Edward VIII: His Place in Numismatics.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#12
BWA ½d 1937-.jpg


BWA 1d 1937.jpg


The full set of denominations was issued for King George VI.

The the penny and halfpenny were first, in 1937.

The remainder of the denominations was issued from 1938 onwards.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#13
BWA 3d 1938.jpg


BWA 3d 1945.jpg


The threepence was once more issued in copper-nickel.

The crowned portrait of George VI was the work of Royal Mint artist Percy Metcalfe.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14
BWA 6d 1938.jpg


The sixpence was now issued in nickel-brass, rather than tin-brass.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.