Author Topic: Chinese Charm(?) - Translation  (Read 1114 times)

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Offline JRM24

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Chinese Charm(?) - Translation
« on: February 04, 2015, 04:12:32 PM »
Dear Fellow Collectors,

I'm fairly new to the field of world coins, having spent most of my numismatic interest in years past on ancient coinage.  In any event, I have recently begun exploring the exciting field of charms and came across a reverse type (legend) that I cannot translate, despite having checked a number of on-line sources (photograph attached).

The obverse depicts a coiled dragon: 30mm - 9.02 grams.

The reverse legend/inscription might provide a clue as to the charm category this may belong. Any help at all would be appreciated.

Thank you,
John




Online bgriff99

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Re: Chinese Charm(?) - Translation
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2015, 03:17:40 AM »
With a stack of Chinese and Japanese dictionaries, I can't make it out either.   Center character is not in my books.   Similar to 'Han', but probably having something to do with plants. 

Top character is 'zhang' (pinyin) for excelling, grow, or long.   That is seen at the top on some charms.

Right is two words for "all (or together) fields".   A good compound for 'communal farm', but I don't find the two words together in any dictionary.

Bottom character seems stylized, or mixed with seal script or something.   Closest words might be "lu" for 'arranged, or 'compared', or "ming" for 'decree'.

Left character is way out there.   Looks like a brand, or stylized name of something.

Overall, and very tentatively, I'd guess it is an agricultural award, as might be passed out to individuals within a particular commune, or to a whole collective unit.

Offline SquareEarth

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Re: Chinese Charm(?) - Translation
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2015, 04:29:44 PM »
First of all, the script.

In Chinese, there are two ways to read a coin:


The coin you've given follows the "straight reading" layout.

And the four characters are:

"長命富貴" (Chang Ming Fu Gui)

meaning "Long life, Wealthy, Prestigious".

It's a common legend in Chinese "flower money" or "tomb money", just google "長命富貴 花錢“ and you would find many coins with exactly the same words.

The central character in the square is ”漢“(han), meaning "Chinese".

The unique thing about this coin is that it's written wrong, and certainly not written by a literate Chinese, whether it's made by foreigners or an illiterate Chinese is to anyone's guess, but my own thought is that it's made by a foreigner: it can be a Southeast Asian imitation, or more probably, European/American fantasy money.

I found one coin exactly the same: (http://data.shouxi.com/item.php?id=619)
« Last Edit: November 10, 2015, 08:53:21 PM by Niels »
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Online bgriff99

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Re: Chinese Charm(?) - Translation
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2015, 05:59:38 PM »
Thanks for the help!    I went through Chen Hung-hsi's book of Curio Coins, and saw the Chang Ming Fu Gui pieces, fifteen pages worth.   Just opened it again to see if I have any to post the correct writing, and there tucked in among pages of clasps and pendants I skipped past this exact coin.  And it says too, "center Han".   It gives a surprisingly high price of 1500 Taiwanese yuan.   

Offline JRM24

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Re: Chinese Charm(?) - Translation
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2015, 09:13:22 PM »
Thank you both for your very informative and much appreciated assistance!

John

Offline Chinasmith

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Re: Chinese Charm(?) - Translation
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2015, 10:04:19 AM »
This piece (with dragon on the other side) is commonly seen in the USA but is rare in the far east. It is believed to have been made in the United States -- which explains the badly blundered Chinese characters. It may have been a souvenir from some Chinatown in the USA or it may have been used by some magician.
Researcher on coins, paper money and tokens of China.