Author Topic: Explorers on coins  (Read 4337 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2020, 12:51:28 AM »
Iceland, 1000 kronur, 2000.  Silver collector coin.

Leif Erikson.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Alex Island

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2020, 10:12:19 AM »
Joliet and Marquette to the discovery of atomic energy (I don't know what the meaning is, but I think it's subtle humor  ??? ) :
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2020, 11:38:49 AM »
If we added a "from" at the beginning ("From Jolliet and Marquette to the discovery of atomic energy"), it would make some sense. :) Jolliet and Marquette explored the rivers in the area, from the Mississippi to roughly where Chicago, Illinois is. That was in the 1670s - and less than 300 years later, "at the University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi and Leo Szilard initiated the first human controlled atomic chain reaction in history." (Dec-1942, Source) Saying that atomic or nuclear energy was "discovered" in IL is a little silly, but at least there is some connection ...

Christian

Offline Alex Island

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2020, 01:26:23 PM »
If we added a "from" at the beginning ("From Jolliet and Marquette to the discovery of atomic energy"), it would make some sense. :) Jolliet and Marquette explored the rivers in the area, from the Mississippi to roughly where Chicago, Illinois is. That was in the 1670s - and less than 300 years later, "at the University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi and Leo Szilard initiated the first human controlled atomic chain reaction in history." (Dec-1942, Source) Saying that atomic or nuclear energy was "discovered" in IL is a little silly, but at least there is some connection ...

Christian


It seemed to me that the humor here is that these two travelers are looking for atomic energy in the jungle with the Indians.
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2020, 05:50:32 PM »
Well, they ran over it in their canoe. Took Fermi and Szliard 300 years to find it again. ;D

Bruce
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2020, 06:17:06 PM »
Ok, I'll go for another Leif Ericson coin. 2000 "Founder of the New World" non-circulating Millenium Dollar.

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Offline chrisild

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2020, 06:53:41 PM »
Somewhat strange terminology if you ask me. The Icelandic coin in reply #15 says "Fundur Norđur-Ameríku", and that apparently means "Discovery of North America". Sure, discovery from a European POV, but it makes sense. Now "Founder of the New World" ... what exactly did he found? The "found" in "Newfoundland" won't work. ;)

Christian

Offline brandm24

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2020, 10:30:04 PM »
"FINDER of the New World" sounds better, but I suppose they were thinking something along the lines of "Found new land", or Newfoundland. Alright, I need a nap now; I'm thinking way too much. ;D

Bruce
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Offline Henk

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Re: Explorers on coins
« Reply #23 on: January 01, 2021, 04:08:43 PM »
I have this 48 page book with the title Ships & Explorers on coins. It was published in 1970. It is more about ships than explorers. I attach a picture of the cover and the table of contents.