PK Paris (Paris Kermesse)

Started by davidrj, January 13, 2015, 02:33:44 PM

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davidrj

I spent the morning watching coverage of the ceremony to honour the three French police officers, killed in the awful events last week

Then the postman brought this,  I assume a discount token for 10 centimes, early 20th C, brass 30mm



Paris in happier times

David

Figleaf

#1
Great fun piece. Very nicely done with Sacré Coeur (or is it the Panthéon or the Dôme des Invaldes?), the Paris eye ;) and the Eiffel tower in the background. PARIS KERMESSE is Paris fun fair. VALABLE POUR UN APPAREIL is valid for a machine. That makes it look like a slot machine token. Going by the clothes, the metal and the style of the piece, I would say 1918 - 1923: after the first world war as brass was a war material, but spent shell casings were cheap. Happier times in the sense of relief that the war is over and you can celebrate with your girlfriend. Unhappy times for the many families losing members. Just about any French city, town or village has a memorial of the first world war with an impressive list of names. Some last names occur three or even four times.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

davidrj

#2
True for many British towns and villages too  :(

A slot machine token makes perfect sense, thank you

maxmissy

Really very nice, never seen it
Congratulations !

malj1

Perhaps issued earlier? concurrent with the large size 10 centimes.

Or was it issued later because of the lack of the large size 10c for the slot machines that took this size coin?
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Figleaf

She is dresses like Mary Poppins. He is dressed like Vlad Lenin. Looks like post-war to me. It may indeed have been a question of replacing the old double sous, that had disappeared from circulation.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

Yes, an emancipated young woman from the 1920's.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

andyg

Skirt length is probably key, ankle length was out by world war one - driven in part because such long skirts were too restrictive of movement. I would suggest this piece dates from 1900 to 1915...
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Afrasi

I need help with this token!

14. Boulevard Saint-Martin, Paris
Valable pour un Appareil (Valid for one Machine/Device/Camera/Apparatus/Appliance/Gadget/.../?)

This token has a very unusual edge and is larger than most machine tokens (32.5 mm).

malj1

I don't have any ideas about this yet. Your one seems to have been altered in some way? ???  ...which could have increased the size a couple of millimetres. Jammed in machine? ???

I found another nicer token on Numista which I have edited a little below. It measures 30mm according to the site.  ;)
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Afrasi

Thanks! Does anybody know, who or what was "P K"?

malj1

Probably it is the initials of an amusement arcade or its owner from some time ago; perhaps from prior to 1921 when the 10 centimes was also measuring 30mm like the British penny.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Figleaf

No ideas, just loose thoughts. I agree with Malj1 that the border is machined. Just wondering if the edge is so sharp it could be used as a knife. K is an unusual initial in France. It points at an Eastern European name, possible of Polish or Russian provenance (Pjotr or Paul would fit as a first name).

The address is now a modern concrete-and-glass building, but the street is rather narrow and could not have been much broader around 1920 due to the placement of front doors, so unfit for heavy traffic. The address is outside Paris' amusement district.

Can't think of anything cheap enough to be bought with a token and covered by the term appareil. BTW, appareil is also used for a set of false teeth ;) Big mechanical stuff would normally be called machine. A small device on loan or for rent would be more logical. I wonder when headphones were invented...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

#13
I wonder if PK chewing gum was available in France? ???
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

maxmissy

I think I got it !
In fact this token was used in automatic machines ( pianos, etc...)
PK means " Paris Kermesse " which was a manufacturer of automatic devices
Have a look to this picture dating from 1920 : The shop with two columns is named " Paris Kermesse " and the address is 14 Boulevard St Martin
http://parismuseescollections.paris.fr/fr/musee-carnavalet/oeuvres/facade-sur-rue-paris-kermesse-14-boulevard-saint-martin-10eme#infos-principales
Here below is an advertisement dating from 1922