Coinage of Malawi

Started by <k>, December 16, 2014, 06:17:17 PM

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<k>

#15
Malawi 1 tambala 1971.jpg


The reverse of the 1 tambala coin featured a cockerel.

The same cockerel design had previously featured on the reverse of the 6 pence coin.

However, it was now shown facing the opposite direction.

The cockerel was the symbol of President Banda's political party.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The reverse of the 2 tambala coin.

It featured the paradise whydah bird (Vidua paradisaea).
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Paradise whydah bird.jpg

The long-tailed paradise whydah bird (male).
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The reverse of the 5 tambala coin featured the purple heron (Ardea purpurea).

These designs were used into the 21st century.

The 5 tambala coin was of the same size and weight as the 6 pence coin that it replaced.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The reverse of the 10 tambala coin.

The maize design had previously appeared on the shilling.

The 10 tambala coin was of the same size and weight as the shilling coin that it replaced.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The reverse of the 20 tambala coin.

It featured the elephant and calf design that had previously graced the florin.


The 20 tambala coin was of the same size and weight as the 2 shillings coin that it replaced.

This was the highest subunit coin, as a 50 tambala coin was not issued until 1986.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




A 1 kwacha collector coin was issued in 1971, which did not circulate.

It commemorated the Introduction of decimal currency

The coin was 38.74 mm in diameter and weighed 28 grams.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PREDECIMAL TO DECIMAL DESIGN CONTINUITY.



Predecimal coinage of Malawi, 1964.





Decimal coinage of Malawi from 1971 onward.


When Malawi adopted a decimal coinage, the corn cob on the shilling and the elephants on the florin were transferred to the 10 tambala and 20 tambala respectively. This made sense, because a shilling was equal to 10 tambala in value, and a florin was equivalent to 20 tambala.

Curiously, the cockerel design on the 6 pence coin was not transferred to its decimal equivalent, the 5 tambala, which featured a purple heron instead. The cockerel design ended up on the lowly bronze 1 tambala. Logic would have suggested that the new 1 tambala coin should given to the new design of the heron, while the cockerel moved to the 5 tambala coin. However, this was not the case.


See also:  The pound: predecimal to decimal design continuity.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malawi unadopted 1 tambala design 1971.jpg

Unadopted design for the Malawi 1 tambala.


See some of the decimal designs that were not ultimately adopted:

Malawi: adopted and unadopted designs of 1971.
.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#25
Malawi obverse.jpg

From 1975 onward a diacritic was added to the "W" in "Malawi" on the obverse legend.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#26



In 1986 Malawi issued its first 50 tambala circulation coin.

The coin was made of nickel-brass.

It introduced a new colour and metal to the coinage.


The coin weighed 11.35 grams and had a diameter of 30 mm.

This 50 tambala type, portraying President Banda, was last issued in 1994.

The reverse design featured the coat of arms.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

CHANGES TO THE METALS USED IN THE COINAGE.

By the 1980s, metal prices began to rise substantially.

In 1984 Malawi began minting its 1 and 2 tambala coins in copper-plated steel.

Previously they had been made of bronze.


In 1989 Malawi began minting its 5, 10 and 20 tambala coins in nickel-plated steel.

Previously they had been made of copper-nickel.


These changes made the coinage cheaper to produce.

Similar changes were taking place globally.


Otherwise, the coins retained the same designs and dimensions.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




Malawi issued its first circulation kwacha coin in 1992.

This version was issued in 1992 only.


The coin was made of nickel-brass.

It weighed 9.4 grams and had a diameter of 26 mm.


Like the 1 tambala coin, it depicted a cockerel on the reverse.

A portrait of President Banda appeared on the obverse as usual.


Curiously, the 50 tambala was significantly smaller and lighter than the older 1 kwacha coin.

This was despite the fact that both coins were round and made of nickel-brass.

This reflected the growing world trend towards smaller and lighter coins.


Interestingly, Australia is another country with a similar size mismatch between two of its coins.

Australia's round aluminum-bronze 2 dollar coin is smaller than its 1 dollar coin.

It was introduced in 1988, three years after the 1 dollar coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malawi cockerels.jpg


The cockerel now appeared on two of Malawi's circulation coins. The design had been a constant feature of the coinage.

It reflected President Banda's continuing importance in Malawi. However, these cockerels were about to fly from the coinage.


See also:

Circulation sets with duplicate pictorial designs.

Coin designs that were reversed.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.