Modern coinage of Bermuda

Started by <k>, July 22, 2014, 08:26:08 PM

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<k>

Bermuda $1 1983~.jpg


Bermuda $5 1983.JPG


In 1983 Bermuda issued a dollar coin and a 5 dollar coin. Both were in nickel-brass.

The dollar looked similar in shape, size and colour to the UK pound coin, also released that year.

Or perhaps not so curiously, since the Royal Mint produced both coins.


The dollar showed a cahow, and an onion was featured on the 5 dollar coin.

These coins were issued again in 1986 only.

They were demonetised in 1990.

I am curious to know whether the 5 dollar coin ever circulated.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1



The map, or bird's eye view, of Bermuda, first appeared on the 1959 crown.

It was designed by Norman Sillman.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Bermuda $1 1970.jpg


The map was next seen on the silver dollar collector coin of 1970.

This design was the work of Michael Rizzello.

He also designed Bermuda's first decimal coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Bermuda $1 1972.jpg


The map was seen again on this collector dollar of 1972.

It commemorated the 20th anniversary of the Queen's reign.

Bermuda is a British overseas territory and not independent.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4
Bermuda $3 2000.jpg


And here the map is seen once more on a gold 3 dollar coin of the year 2000.

The map has almost become a cliché on Bermuda's coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5


Bermuda's first decimal coins, issued in 1970.

They did not show a map, nor did they include a dollar coin.



Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6


As a young collector, I particularly liked the angelfish design.




But everybody's favourite seems to be the boar on the 1 cent coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7


The white-tailed tropic bird on the 25 cents coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8
Bermuda 1970 pack.JPG


Bermuda 1970 pack-.JPG

Any Britons old enough to remember the first official UK decimal coins set, that was sold from post offices in the late 1960s, will recognise the style of this similar Bermudian set.  The outline of the islands is shown on the pack.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Pabitra

#9
Quote from: <k> on July 22, 2014, 08:26:08 PMI am curious to know whether the 5 dollar coin ever circulated.

Quote from: <k> on July 22, 2014, 08:56:20 PMBermuda's first decimal coins, issued in 1970, did not show a map, nor did they include a dollar coin.
Bermuda.jpg

5 Dollar coin was never a circulation coin.

1 Dollar coin is now in regular circulation.

<k>

Quote from: Pabitra on July 23, 2014, 09:19:20 AM
5 Dollar coin was never a circulation coin.

As I suspected. It was a large denomination for those days.

Quote from: Pabitra on July 23, 2014, 09:19:20 AM
1 Dollar coin is now in regular circulation.

The new coin was introduced in 1988 and is significantly larger than the old, being 26.2mm in diameter. It portrays a dinghy, instead of the bird over the island.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11


A detailed look at the dollar dinghy design.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Pabitra

Quote from: <k> on July 23, 2014, 11:31:46 AM

The new coin was introduced in 1988 and is significantly larger than the old,

Unlike most of the other countries, 50 cent was stopped somewhere in between.

<k>

#13



The last 50 cents coin (for circulation) was issued in 1988.

Probably this is due to the American influence.

I've never visited the USA, but apparently the half dollar coin is not popular there.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Pabitra

Most of the Island nations in the region  have been avoiding that denomination.
Bahamas and East Caribbean Islands are main examples.

By the way, what does that Coat of Arms signify?
The shield appears to reflect either sinking of Titanic or symbolises Bermuda Triangle :-(