Author Topic: Congo gold 1965 proof set  (Read 2562 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline beehammer

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Congo gold 1965 proof set
« on: July 22, 2014, 03:17:54 AM »
Included are pictures of the two reverse types of 100 Franc Gold Proof coins found in  the 1965 CONGO GOLD PROOF SET - (originally 5 pieces/denominations).

I consider them "type 1" and "type 2" - notice the reverse on each: one has 100 Fr above the date (type 1) and the other below (type 2).

Here's the questions: anyone have any thoughts on this - short run of initially 3000 sets, sources say perhaps 70% were subsequently melted.  So, not to many of these around - anyone have information on the designer/engraver? Why two different reverses for a short run?  Any thoughts, any information.

A note: a few of these have been graded by PCGS, NGC, etc - However the population reports do not address the two "types" - therefore hard to tell the actual extant populations of either.

Thanks for your input.

RKL

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 176
Re: Congo gold 1965 proof set
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2014, 03:00:21 PM »
If you need a refresher on the bloody, tortured way to independence of the former Belgian Congo, look here.

Kasavubu was overthrown in 1965, making these medals instantly politically incorrect. That, combined with utter lack of demand, probably accounts for the re-melting. My early stone age copy of Schön has no info on mint or engraver. If I were betting, I would bet South Africa.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline beehammer

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Re: Congo gold 1965 proof set
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2014, 10:16:58 PM »
FYI: Another recent look at the CONGO - - "Battleground Africa: Cold War in the Congo, 1960–1965," Lise Namikas. 2013-Woodrow Wilson Center Press.

I actually lived in the CONGO during the mid-late 1960's, and there was indeed plenty of GOOD, BAD, and UGLY to go around.

However, who knows how things may have turned out if KASA-VUBU would have stayed in office a bit longer. 

At any rate, the coins in the 1965 SET do represent the CONGO's first Gold Coinage, and are historically important to the study of Congo/African Numismatics, if for no other reason than that.  They follow the trend around Africa at the time (1960's) for GOLD (and other metals) Independence Proof Sets with Presidential figures on the obverses - Burundi (1962), etc.

Indeed, they may have come and gone in an instant, because of political changes, etc. but, these coins do display some beautiful design parameters.  These gold coins as well as the 1965 10 Franc for circulation, (minted in Belgium), are cumulatively the first coins of the "Independent" CONGO.

Offline bart

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 612
Re: Congo gold 1965 proof set
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2014, 03:35:21 PM »
Quote from: Figleaf
My early stone age copy of Schön has no info on mint or engraver.


In a book, issued by the Royal Mint of Belgium about foreign coins minted at the Brussels Mint (Didier Vanoverbeek, Buitenlandse muntslag in Brussel 1785-2013) there is a side note on this issue at p.45: (After the issue of the aluminum 10 francs of 1965) "Except of some commemorative issues in gold and silver, issued by private mints like f.i. the 1965 issues minted by Argor from Chiasso (Switzerland) ...   ... Congo issued afterwards seldom metal money."

That's also clearly put on the coins.

Online Afrasi

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 495
  • To do is to doo be dooh ...
Re: Congo gold 1965 proof set
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2014, 03:37:27 PM »
These coins are also missing in the catalogue of Martin Yandesa Mavuzi.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 176
Re: Congo gold 1965 proof set
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2014, 03:41:58 PM »
However, who knows how things may have turned out if KASA-VUBU would have stayed in office a bit longer. 

We don't and we'll never know. However, the question reminded me of an incident in my life. I worked as an economist with an international organisation and was an early internet user. Via a chat site for economists, I was contacted by a man calling himself Joseph who wanted a crash course in nation building (BTW, there is no way I could check his identity.) He told me he would succeed his father as leader of a country that remained nameless, but was in sub-Saharan Africa.

In the next few days, I spent hours with him, talking about economics, development and democracy and how they interact. He was smart and a quick learner. I must admit he did not live up to my expectations, or maybe I was/am too naive.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.