Author Topic: S. Portland St. Suspension Bridge Glasgow  (Read 1222 times)

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Offline malj1

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S. Portland St. Suspension Bridge Glasgow
« on: June 30, 2014, 12:55:42 AM »
This one appeared on eBay but went beyond my price for a scruffy piece.  ;D or perhaps its just a lousy photo?  ???

1853 Pass Token For S. Portland St. Suspension Bridge Glasgow rev. shows a tree with a bell and fish with the legend 'LET GLASGOW FLOURISH'

Seller remarks possibly Silver? it has the appearance of a lead communion token from where I am sitting.

Malcolm
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Online Figleaf

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Re: S. Portland St. Suspension Bridge Glasgow
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2014, 10:41:48 AM »
Not a communion token, but probably a toll bridge token. The text on the upper picture is SOUTH PORTLAND STREET / SUSPENSION BRIDGE. That bridge still exists. The tree, bell and herring are elements of the Glasgow city arms, as are the bird and the ribbon.

Peter

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: S. Portland St. Suspension Bridge Glasgow
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2014, 10:56:36 AM »
I intended to convey that it was more of the composition of communion tokens such as lead. [rather than silver]

Kushi lists it as GBR-S 420 RA and describes it as Pewter.

Ronnie Breingan lists it as RB440 and describes it as white-metal oval 23X13mm

[Scottish Transport Tokens]
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Online Figleaf

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Re: S. Portland St. Suspension Bridge Glasgow
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2014, 11:10:55 AM »
In the 1850's, when the bridge was erected, lead was again* widely known to be poisonous. Therefore, the metal is more likely to be tin, a metal that is soft enough to explain what Malcolm calls its scruffiness. :) Another possibility is zinc, which is somewhat harder.

Peter

* The Romans knew it was, but that knowledge was lost in the Middle Ages.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.