Author Topic: Punch Mark Coin: Silver Vimshatika, ca500 BC, Unpublished, "Anonymous" Janapada  (Read 7655 times)

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Offline mitresh

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........and here are the individual coin pics
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Offline mitresh

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pic 2
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Offline mitresh

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pic 3 (image compression makes the coin appear a bit cracked though its not!)
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Offline mitresh

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pic 4
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Offline mitresh

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pic 5
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Offline mitresh

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pic 6
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Offline Figleaf

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Excellent, Mitresh! Thank you. What this new series brings out is that the reverses are only sort of blank. They show remnants of similar or the same punch marks at the edge and a flat area in the centre. Numbers 3 and 6 have similar small flat areas on the obverse. In particular on number 3, they seem to correspond with clear punch marks on the opposite side. Also, on number 5, I see marks over "overstriking", highly similar to the marks on later Mughal rupees and coppers.

Obviously, I wasn't around when the marks were applied and the evidence is flimsy, but that won't stop me from speculating. It looks like the punchmarks were added one by one by different parties. If one side was full, the marking would continue on the other side, obliterating the marks on the full side, so that it could be re-cycled.

One step further, the small marks may have been added by merchants, while the big marks, that took more force to apply, therefore calling for unpaid labour, may stand for a temple. As the largest mark tends to be the sun-like symbol, I prefer the hypothesis that it was applied in a temple to the possibility that it stands for a local chief, as the local chief would be succeeded by another, who would want to have his own mark. Still, it might be a clan mark, with subtle variations for different chiefs.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.