Author Topic: Scottish, umm, coins  (Read 4600 times)

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Offline chrisild

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Scottish, umm, coins
« on: May 19, 2014, 07:21:32 PM »
While it is quite unlikely that Scotland becomes independent, a company in London, England has designed some "Scottish coin prototypes". ;D  The set consists of nine denominations.

1 pence (sic), 2 pence, 5 pence:
Cutty Sark ("copper" pieces)
10, 20, 50 pence:
Robert Burns (Nordic Gold/brass)
1 ryal, 2 ryals, 5 ryals:
Sir William Wallace (bimetallic)

The company behind these "patterns" is the International Numismatic Agency Ltd. INA has suggested "British euro" coins, and sold such medals, before ...

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2014, 09:19:23 PM »
Ryal or royal was the name of a gold coin known to catalogue makers as a rose noble, tariffed at 10 shillings. The name would therefore make sense (at least to historians and coin collectors) if it were issued at 50p = 1 ryal.

There's neither honesty, manhood, nor good fellowship in thee, nor thou camest not of the blood royal, if thou darest not stand for ten shillings - Henry IV, Part I, I.ii.158

Rabby Bairns is of course unavoidable, but he makes the Cutty Sark questionable, since the expression was made famous by Burns' poem Tam O'Shanter:

Till first ae caper, syne anither,
Tam tint his reason a thegither,
And roars out, "Weel done, Cutty-sark!"


I highly disagree with choosing William Wallace. He's a failure. Romantic, but a failure. He owes his fame mostly to Braveheart lore. Robert the Bruce, a semi-villain in Braveheart, achieved Scottish independence, not Wallace. I would applaud Eilean Donan castle, but I realise a more modern building is called for to offset the antiquities. The Riverside museum in Glasgow, perhaps?

An outline of Ben Nevis with a rhododendron would make a good subject and neutralise a Lowlands domination. Just no bagpipes and Nessies, please.

Peter
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Offline constanius

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2014, 04:39:48 PM »
I see (by "sic") that you spotted the 1 Scots Pence, that really does grate.

Perhaps they should use bawbee, bodle, turner, even testoon, etc instead of Sasanach terms.

Pat

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2014, 08:39:38 PM »
If this is about the spelling, sure, except that this design could have been made by an Italian whose English is good enough to communicate. If it's about choosing the term Scottish pence, there was such an animal (though only in the plural). If I remember correctly, there were 5 pennies Scots to an English (pre-decimal) penny. If the royal would be 50p, a Scots penny would be an English decimal halfpence, so presumably, there would be no need for a 1, 2 and 5. The alternative names proposed above are for higher value coins.

If war should threaten to break out over this weighty issue, "turner" (2 pennies Scots) would be the next historically correct choice, except that it happens to be the name of an extended family within the highland Lamont clan :) The MacDonalds would want a coin with a hamburger and the Camerons would propose a Roy Liechtenstein or Andy Warhol design. :) It might be better to come up with a neutral, but vaguely Scottish-sounding name, such as "oodle". ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online <k>

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2014, 10:58:36 PM »
If this is about the spelling, sure

No, it's about the grammar.

a Scots penny would be an English decimal halfpence

Singular: a penny or (halfpenny); plural: pence.

Curiously, in the decimal era, most people spoke of "a halfpence" instead of a halfpenny, until the denomination disappeared. In predecimal times, we said "ha'penny" (pronounced "HAIP-nee").

Offline chrisild

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2014, 11:37:27 PM »
The INA is a company in England, not in Scotland, but of course they know that even in the North a penny is a penny, not a pence. As for possible denominations, keep in mind that these are private patterns, basically medals. So why care? ;D  The name "ryal" and its history I find more interesting ...

Christian

Offline annovi.frizio

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2014, 12:19:24 AM »
my proposal:



see here other image

http://www.friziodesign.it/coins18.html

 8) 8) 8)
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2014, 12:21:53 AM »
Bravo, Frizio! Historic, yet modern. Really beautiful.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline annovi.frizio

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2014, 12:23:44 AM »
tanchiu'  :-)) see other image...
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Offline annovi.frizio

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2014, 06:12:23 PM »


 ;D
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Offline Prosit

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2014, 06:32:23 PM »
Looks like a thistle turnip  >:D

Dale





 ;D

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Scottish, umm, coins
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2014, 12:09:36 AM »
A bit too heraldic for my taste, with emblem, arms and flag, but the poor Scots may like it, as they are used to heraldry on coins. The crown would indeed likely be removed from the emblem. The leaves are a bit too spiny, giving the impression that they are not connected to the stem, but two loose branches of olive. However, the flower is superb. It is clear in its symbolism, yet fresh in its execution.

What would you put on the other side?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.